Alaska volcano quiets down after making ashy mess

March 29, 2009 By RACHEL D'ORO , Associated Press Writer
A skier makes a trail through the ash from Redoubt Volcano Saturday, March 28, 2009, as he and others break down the material used for U.S. Alpine Championships at the ski area 40 miles south of Anchorage. The ash which fell shortly after the men's downhill event blanketed the mountain. The volcano, about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, first erupted Sunday night with the most resent eruption Saturday afternoon. (AP Photo/Al Grillo)

(AP) -- Alaska's Mount Redoubt has simmered down after spreading a coating of gritty volcanic ash over scores of communities that include the state's largest city of Anchorage.

Monitors at the Observatory say the volcano was emitting low-level Sunday but no more eruptions.

The calm follows several strong eruptions Saturday that spewed an ash cloud 100 miles northeast to Anchorage and beyond.

Observatory volcanologist Game McGimsey says the accumulation of ash about 50 miles away at Nikiski was as thick as a dime.

The volcano became active a week ago, followed by at least 18 eruptions. McGimsey says the eruptions are like "bullets coming out of a gun barrel."

The last time the volcano erupted was in 1989-90.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: New eruptions at Alaska's Mount Redoubt volcano

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