Scientists Create Light-Bending Nanoparticles

Mar 03, 2009 By Laura Mgrdichian feature
Directional scattering of an incoming electromagnetic wave by oriented nanocups. Image courtesy Nikolay Mirin, Rice University.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Metallic nanoparticles and other structures can manipulate light in ways that are not possible with conventional optical materials. In a recent example of this, Rice University researchers discovered that cup-shaped gold nanostructures can bend light in a controllable way. The cups act like three-dimensional nano-antennas.

The research is described in the February 19, 2008, online edition of Nano Letters.

When light interacts with nanoparticles and other tiny structures, many interesting and even dramatic physical effects can occur. For example, man-made "metamaterials" have very fine structures with features smaller than the wavelength of light, some just tens of atoms across, imparting them with unique and often intriguing optical behaviors. Metamaterials are of interest to scientists because they may be able to interact with light in ways that naturally occurring materials cannot.

The gold nanocups created in this research interact with light in two main ways: axially, the up-down direction, or transverse, the left-right direction. The transverse mode is by far the stronger of the two.

"When we illuminated the nanocups, the transverse interaction exhibited a strong scattering resonance," said Rice University researcher Naomi Halas, the study's corresponding scientist, to PhysOrg.com. She conducted the study with colleague Nikolay Mirin. "We learned that the direction of the transverse resonant light scattering depends on the orientation of the cups, a property that has not been observed in studies of similar structures."

Specifically, the cups behave like a "split-ring resonator," a type of metamaterial with a negative refractive index—the ability to refract (not reflect) light partially or fully backward. Split-ring resonators look like two concentric, non-touching rings that have each been split in half. When placed in a microwave or infrared field, an alternating current of that same frequency is induced in each ring. Each current in turn induces its own magnetic field at that same microwave or infrared frequency, which can either oppose or enhance the original field.

Split-ring resonators can support resonant wavelengths that are much larger than their size. But since split-ring resonators are flat, their light-scattering abilities are restricted to a plane.

Halas and Mirin's nanocups are much like three dimensional versions of split-ring resonators. When light with the proper frequency is applied, a resonant electron current is induced in the cups. This current produces an electric field that is parallel to the cup opening (not parallel to the cup axis). The scattered light is emitted perpendicular to that field; in other words, in whatever direction the cup's axis is pointing.

This unique light-redirecting property should prove to be very useful in the development of new optical materials and devices, from solar cells to light attenuators to chip-to-chip optical interconnects in futuristic circuitry.

"In this line of research, many other types of nanoparticles and nanostructures can be designed to have this type of light-redirecting property," said Halas.

Halas and Mirin created the nanocups by depositing latex or polystyrene nanoparticles, each about 80 nanometers in diameter, onto a sheet of glass. They coated the particles and the glass with a 20-nanometer-thick layer of gold, applying the gold from different angles to make sure both the sides and tops of each particle were covered, yet leaving an uncoated circular or elliptical "shadow" next to each particle, exposing the surface below.

Finally, they poured an elastic polymer was poured over the array and, when the polymer had cured, peeled it off to reveal a transparent film embedded with gold nanocups.

More information: Nano Lett., Article ASAP • DOI: 10.1021/nl900208z

Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com.
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.

Explore further: Researchers make nanostructured carbon using the waste product sawdust

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA Webb's heart survives deep freeze test

6 hours ago

After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, ...

Recommended for you

Nanoparticle technology triples the production of biogas

Oct 22, 2014

Researchers of the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), a Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence, and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have developed the new BiogàsPlus, a technology which allows ...

Research unlocks potential of super-compound

Oct 22, 2014

Researchers at The University of Western Australia's have discovered that nano-sized fragments of graphene - sheets of pure carbon - can speed up the rate of chemical reactions.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Arkaleus
not rated yet Mar 03, 2009
Nice. Nanoscale, solid-state optical switching. Optical computers are go for launch.
Ethelred
not rated yet Mar 10, 2009
It looked like redirection rather than switching. Light was absorbed and redirected not like in a mirror but perpendicular to the plane of the nanocups. It could for instance be used in a solar thermal array without a need for a movable mount.

Ethelred