Elpida Ready to Launch World's Largest Capacity (16-Gigabyte) FB-DIMM

Aug 06, 2008

Elpida Memory, Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), announced today that it is ready to launch 16-gigabyte Fully Buffered DIMM (FB-DIMM), the world's largest capacity FB-DIMM. Based on its own unique integrated packaging technology (stacked FBGA or sFBGA) with 2-gigabit DDR2 SDRAM Elpida has achieved development of FB-DIMM products that feature an ultra thin thickness of 7.7mm along with the world's largest capacity of 16 gigabytes.

Elpida's new FB-DIMM incorporates high-end DIMM circuit board design and simulation verification technique. It features Elpida's unique heat spreader design to meet the need for larger capacity and for more stringent thermal and reliability requirements. In addition to achieving greater memory density and multiple-rank function to significantly upgrade system performance Elpida has applied 2-gigabit DDR2 low-power DRAMs and IDT's low-power AMB device to achieve a level of power consumption comparable to existing 8-gigabyte products and to contribute to lower system power requirements.

"Elpida has combined low-power technology and high-density stacking technology to achieve the world's largest capacity 16-gigabyte FB-DIMM," said Yasushi Takahashi, an Elpida executive officer and division manager of the company's Server & PC division. "We believe our new DIMM product is an excellent response to server market demand – for example, from data center customers – for low-power and high-density performance. Elpida continues to focus on developing products featuring superior low-power, high-density characteristics."

Sample shipments of the new 16-gigabyte FB-DIMM will begin later this month. Mass production is expected to get underway in the 4Q of CY 2008.

Elpida intends to complement its presence in existing markets by using its new large-capacity FB-DIMM as a vehicle to enter new markets, such as FB-DIMM for ultra high-end servers and work stations.

Source: Elpida

Explore further: Using materials other than silicon for next generation electronic devices

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