Intel, Micron First to Deliver Sub-40 Nanometer NAND Flash Memory Device

May 29, 2008
Intel, Micron First to Deliver Sub-40 Nanometer NAND Flash Memory Device
New 34nm 32 Gb NAND Chip from Intel and Micron is Industry´s Most Advanced NAND Process Technology Available and Enables Increased Storage Capacity in Small Form-Factor Applications.

Today Intel Corporation and Micron Technology, Inc. introduced the industry's first sub-40 nanometer NAND memory device, unveiling a 34nm 32 gigabit multi-level cell chip. This process technology was jointly developed by Intel and Micron and manufactured by the companies' NAND flash joint venture, IM Flash Technologies (IMFT).

It is the smallest NAND process geometry on the market. The 32 Gb NAND chip is the only monolithic device at this density that fits into a standard 48-lead thin small-outline package (TSOP), providing a cost-effective path to higher densities in existing applications. Shipments of customer samples begin in June and mass production is expected during the second half of this year calendar.

"This new 32 Gb device provides the best bit storage density available in the industry," said Brian Shirley, vice president of Micron's Memory Group. "Together with our partners at Intel, we're proud to have now taken the lead in production process technology."

"The introduction of 34nm process technology highlights IMFT's rapid progress and moves us to the forefront of NAND process technology," said Pete Hazen, director of marketing, Intel NAND Products Group. "These advancements will expand the value proposition and accelerate the adoption of solid-state drive (SSD) solutions in computing platforms."

The 34nm 32 Gb chips will be manufactured on 300 millimeter wafers, each producing approximately 1.6 terabytes of NAND. Measuring just 172mm², less than the size of a thumbnail, the 34nm 32 Gb chip will cost-effectively enable high-density solid-state storage in small form factor applications.

-- A single 32 Gb chip could store more than 2,000 high-resolution digital photos or hold up to 1,000 songs on a personal music player.
-- Two 8-die stacked packages would realize 64 gigabytes (GBs) of storage, enough for recording anywhere from eight to 40 hours of high-definition video in a digital camcorder.

The 34nm 32Gb chip was designed with solid-state drives in mind. The product will enable more cost-effective SSDs, instantly doubling the current storage volume of these devices and driving capacities to beyond 256 GBs in today's standard, smaller 1.8-inch form factor. SSDs are becoming the new storage medium for notebook computers, providing lower power, faster boot-up time, increased reliability, improved performance and reduced noise than hard disk drives. With the innovations in NAND process technology, such as with the 34nm NAND process, SSDs now offer a significant range of capacities to meet market requirements.

Based on the 34nm architecture, Intel and Micron also plan to introduce lower density multi-level cell products including single-level cell products, by the end of this year.

Source: Intel

Explore further: DARPA technology identifies counterfeit microelectronics

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Intel, Micron Introduce 25-Nanometer NAND

Feb 01, 2010

Intel Corporation and Micron Technology, Inc. today announced the world's first 25-nanometer (nm) NAND technology, which provides a more cost-effective path for increasing storage capacity in such popular ...

Recommended for you

Desktop device to make key gun part goes on sale in US

3 hours ago

The creator of the world's first 3D plastic handgun unveiled Wednesday his latest invention: a pre-programmed milling machine that enables anyone to easily make the core component of a semi-automatic rifle.

Twitter-funded lab to seek social media insights

3 hours ago

A new Twitter-funded research project unveiled Wednesday, with access to every tweet ever sent, will look for patterns and insights from the billions of messages sent on social media.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

plasma_guy
5 / 5 (1) May 30, 2008
Samsung already announced 64 Gb NAND recently, didn't they?