Researchers use high tech in mold watermark to protect plastic products from piracy

Mar 28, 2008
Researchers use high tech in mold watermark to protect plastic products from piracy

Researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick have devised a high tech way to add Anti-counterfeiting to plastic products as they are created in the moulding process. The process could cost less than one per cent of the total cost of manaufacturing the product.

Lead researcher Professor Gordon Smith said:

"There is an enormous amount of interest in anti-counterfeiting technology for plastic products. We at the University of Warwick are working on several processes to prevent plastic components being copied and this 'in mould' process is the first of them to be developed for use."

"For commercial reasons we cannot detail collaborators but we are now exploring its use with one company that is plagued by the failure of a counterfeit plastic based safety critical product which is made to look exactly like their safety critical product and therefore damages their reputation as well as losing them sales."

The watermark is created as an intrinsic part of the plastic product as it is being moulded. It would require very detailed technical knowledge and equipment to even attempt to replicate the watermark process.

Professor Smith expects that the new technology will be of significant interest to a range of manufacturer’s products such as DVD s and other discs in the entertainment and computing markets to plastic containers used by a range of consumer industries.

Source: University of Warwick

Explore further: Google building fleet of package-delivering drones

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

ACEs are high with space station colloidal research

Aug 25, 2014

One global marketer took to space to find a way to be leaner and greener back on Earth. For Procter & Gamble (P&G), product innovation and improvement relied on use of the International Space Station (ISS) ...

The fluorescent fingerprint of plastics

Aug 21, 2014

LMU researchers have developed a new process which will greatly simplify the process of sorting plastics in recycling plants. The method enables automated identification of polymers, facilitating rapid separation ...

Recommended for you

Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection

27 minutes ago

Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea.

Alibaba IPO comes with unusual structure

28 minutes ago

Foreigners who want to buy Alibaba Group shares in the Chinese e-commerce giant's U.S. public offering will need to get comfortable with an unusual business structure.

DIY glove-based tutor indicates muscle-memory potential

21 hours ago

A senior editor at IEEE Spectrum worked on a DIY project that enabled his 11-year-old son to improve his touch typing by use of a vibrating glove. His son was already "pretty quick on the keyboard," said ...

User comments : 0