British boy spots dinosaur tracks

Feb 24, 2008

An 8-year-old boy found a pair of 160-million-year-old dinosaur tracks on the beach near his home in England, it was reported.

Rhys Nichols was walking with his father on the beach near Scarborough, North Yorkshire, when he saw the intact 9-inch footprints on a rock, the Daily Mail reported.

"His only disappointment is that they are prints from a plant-eating dinosaur. He would rather they had been from one of the big meat-eating ones like a Tyrannosaurus Rex because they are his favorite," the boy's mother said.

Experts reportedly said the prints likely belong to an herbivorous iguanodon animal that roamed during the Jurassic period.

"This is a great find as dinosaur prints are not normally that clear," archaeologist Will Watts said, "Looking at the size of the prints, the dinosaur was probably the same size as Rhys."

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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