New method for solving differential equations

Jan 24, 2008

Dutch-sponsored mathematician Valeriu Savcenco has developed new methods for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. These so-called multirate methods are highly efficient for large systems, where some components exhibit more active behaviour than others within the same system.

Countless phenomena in various technological and scientific fields are formed by systems of ordinary differential equations. However for large systems of such equations, some components can exhibit more active behaviour than others.

Multirate methods can be a highly efficient approach for solving such problems numerically. In these methods a large time step can be taken for slowly varying components and small steps for components with a more rapid variation. Valeriu Savcenco discusses the design, analysis and experimental results of multirate methods for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations.

This project is being carried out within the NWO Open Competition (now: Free Competition). The project is the first to have won the Peterich Prize. The Free Competition is intended for the best scientific project proposals that do not fall under the NWO themes.

Source: Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research

Explore further: New study utilizes Kinect for Windows technology to teach elementary school students geometry

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Team works to counter a new class of coffee shop hackers

Jan 08, 2015

If you're sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn't connect to the shop's wifi, think again. The bad guys may be able to see what you're doing just ...

How did the chicken beat the infection?

Dec 23, 2014

A new Emmy Noether Group in LMU's Faculty of Veterinary Science is dedicated to understanding the mechanisms that underlie the operation of the immune system in chickens.

Ever tried a 'laser delicious' apple?

Dec 03, 2014

The ability to detect when to harvest "climacteric" fruits—such as apples, bananas, pears and tomatoes—at the precise moment to ensure "peak edibleness" in terms of both taste and texture may soon be ...

Recommended for you

Super Bowl athletes are scientists at work

23 hours ago

Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman gets called a lot of things. He calls himself the greatest cornerback in the NFL (and Seattle fans tend to agree). Sportswriters and some other players call him ...

Reintegrating extremist into society

Jan 30, 2015

The UK government's increasingly punitive response to those involved in terrorism risks undermining efforts to successfully reintegrate former extremists, according to research by the University of St Andrews.

Strategies to enhance intelligence analysis

Jan 30, 2015

If you've ever watched a thriller about undercover agents, you probably have the impression that intelligence officers are models of objectivity, pragmatism and sharp, unbiased thinking. However, in reality ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.