Sony Develops New Close Proximity Wireless Transfer Technology 'TransferJet'

Jan 07, 2008

Sony today announced "TransferJet", a new Close Proximity Wireless Transfer Technology enabling the high speed transfer of large data files (photos, HD images, etc.) between electronic devices such as mobile phones, digital cameras, digital video cameras, computers and TVs. Using this technology, data can be sent at speeds of 560Mbps. Sony will present reference exhibits of this newly developed technology at CES International, to be held in Las Vegas from January 7th.

TransferJet is an extremely simple wireless technology which eliminates the need for complex setup and operation. For example, just touching a TV with a digital camera enables photos to be instantaneously displayed on the TV screen. Alternatively, downloaded music content can be easily enjoyed by touching a mobile phone to a portable audio player. TransferJet can be used as a Universal Interface among a wide variety of consumer electronics devices.

Sony will actively promote the use of TransferJet across the consumer electronics industry and seek to enhance the enjoyment of mobile device-based content through the introduction of various products and services based on this technology.

Main Features of TransferJet:

1) Simple interface and intuitive operation: "Touch & Get"

Just touch two electronic products together and files are transferred automatically. TransferJet eliminates the complex setup procedures required by existing wireless systems, and no access point is necessary. Furthermore, users are also able to register their electronic products to enable TransferJet to recognize specific products. For example, by registering only the devices within their household, users can prevent external data leakage. Operation is also very intuitive, and as there is no host/target relationship, data transfer can take place between mobile phones and PCs for example, as well as between mobile devices.

2) Realizing Stable High Speed Data Transmission

TransferJet's physical layer transmission rate is 560Mbps, and even allowing for error corrections and protocol overheads, the effective physical layer transmission rate is 375Mbps. TransferJet is also capable of selecting the appropriate data transmission rate according to the wireless environment. Even if the conditions for transmission deteriorate, it will maintain the highest possible wireless connectivity by automatically lowering the data transmission rate.

As TransferJet is a close proximity wireless system which radiates very low-intensity radio waves, it causes almost no interference to other wireless systems, and there is no impact to performance even if multiple users simultaneously multiple TransferJet system. Moreover, users of electronic products incorporating TransferJet technology are able to transfer data among each other's products regardless of whether they are indoors or outdoors and irrespective of their geographic location.

3) Development of New "TransferJet Coupler"

Sony's newly developed "TransferJet Coupler" is based on electric induction field coupling to deliver superior propagation performance compared to conventional radiation field based antennas. It maintains high transmission gain and efficient coupling in near-field proximity, while providing sharp attenuation over longer distances to avoid interference with other wireless systems.

Furthermore, as there is no antenna polarization it is possible to transmit data without any performance loss, regardless of the contact angle of the electronic devices.

Source: Sony

Explore further: How WWI codebreakers taught your gas meter to snitch on you

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fukushima study: Think about unthinkable disasters

1 hour ago

(AP)—A U.S. science advisory report says a key lesson from Japan's Fukushima nuclear accident is that the nation's nuclear industry needs to focus more on the highly unlikely but super-serious worst case scenarios.

FX says overnight ratings becoming meaningless

1 hour ago

(AP)—It's a rite nearly as old as television: the morning after a new show premieres, network executives wait impatiently for the Nielsen company's estimate of how many people watched, and rush to report ...

Recommended for you

Cruising high seas, engineers detect fake GPS signals

Jul 29, 2014

Cruising the Mediterranean aboard a superyacht, a Cornell professor and grad student took their Global Positioning System (GPS) research to the high seas. For four days in late June, they tested the newest ...

London mayor expected to say city will rock 5G by 2020

Jul 29, 2014

London mayor Boris Johnson this week will pledge to bring 5G to London in the next six years, reported The Telegraph on Monday. The pledge is part of a more extensive plan for London's infrastructure between ...

FX says overnight ratings becoming meaningless

Jul 24, 2014

(AP)—It's a rite nearly as old as television: the morning after a new show premieres, network executives wait impatiently for the Nielsen company's estimate of how many people watched, and rush to report ...

User comments : 0