Watermarks for mobile television

Oct 01, 2007
Watermarks for mobile television
A video watermark protects the production chain of interactive content for mobile TV. © Fraunhofer SIT

For centuries, watermarks have protected written documents from forgery. Now their digital brothers are to prevent videos from being released in the Internet before their television premieres. Electronic watermarks are used to locate leaks.

People use their cell phones much more actively than their television or radio sets. In order to make mobile television more attractive in the future, program makers intend to provide interactive content in addition to simple viewing. Conventional programs are given special processing for this purpose. Before airing their TV material, broadcasters send it to external service providers who process it and incorporate additional information.

Special protection is needed to ensure that programs will not be published on the Internet before their official TV premieres. In the porTiVity project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Secure Information Technology SIT has developed just such a form of protection: a robust video watermark that permanently labels TV material without hindering the processing work. If such a protected program appears prematurely on the Internet, the broadcasters can use the watermark to locate the leak in the production chain.

“We know from our experience of earlier projects that viewers who receive television via cell phone or PDA would like to become actively involved in the programs,” says Patrick Wolf of the Fraunhofer SIT. The researchers in the porTiVity project are therefore developing a rich media iTV system for mobile television which allows viewers to directly select objects in the picture. “During a football match, for example, viewers could click on individual players to view their goal and assist statistics,” says Wolf. “In this case, the viewer receives additional, optional content. However, program makers can also use the additional information for interactive prize draws or edutainment formats.”

In addition, porTIVity provides an authoring system which allows mobile TV producers to track moving objects. These marked objects can be linked to additional information which appears when the user clicks on them. The additional information is packed with the video files in Material eXchange Format (MXF) and delivered as rich media content to the broadcasting center, where the signal is processed and aired. What ultimately arrives at the mobile receiver is a special MPEG-4 video containing both the main program and the interactive elements.

Source: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Explore further: Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cyber war in Ukraine – business as usual for Russia

Mar 12, 2014

In a war – declared or otherwise – bravery and perseverance are not enough. Communications are important. Effectiveness means being able to command your troops and gather information. It also means being ...

Media sometimes try, fail to keep NSA's secrets

Feb 08, 2014

News organizations publishing leaked National Security Agency documents have inadvertently disclosed the names of at least six intelligence workers and other government secrets they never intended to give ...

Recommended for you

Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

8 hours ago

The U.S. freight railroad industry says only one-fifth of its track will be equipped with mandatory safety technology to prevent most collisions and derailments by the deadline set by Congress.

Gaza cops trade bullets for laser-tech in training

Apr 14, 2014

Security forces in the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip are using technology to practice shooting on laser simulators, saving money spent on ammunition in the cash-strapped Palestinian territory.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

(Phys.org) —Quantenna Communications has announced that it has plans for releasing a chipset that will be capable of delivering 10Gbps WiFi to/from routers, bridges and computers by sometime next year. ...