Sharp to Introduce Seven New Blu-Ray Disc Recorders

Sep 26, 2007

Sharp Corp. will introduce into the Japanese market seven AQUOS Blu-ray Disc Recorders that reflect Sharp's persistent focus on true image quality and easy operability.

The new BD-AV1 and BD-AV10 Series enables recording and playback of digital broadcasts of HDTV programs with the same high-resolution image quality as broadcast with simple operation even easier than VCRs that users are already accustomed to.

As terrestrial digital broadcasting spreads around the world and full-HD LCD TVs become more popular, the desire to be able to easily record high-definition pictures is increasing rapidly. At the same time, there are a great many potential users who still hesitate to upgrade from VCRs due to a preconceived notion that the various types of media and formats in existing HDTV recorders and players make them difficult to use.

These models feature a user interface that can be used easily without relying on the instruction manual. Easy One-Button Operation enables functions such as record, playback, and timer recording to be invoked simply and easily with the press of a single button. A Disc Meter provides peace of mind by clearly indicating at a glance the amount of free disc space remaining on the Blu-ray disc media. And, the Simple Fami-Link Remote is designed with fewer buttons on its top surface to enable users to navigate to the button they want to use without hesitation. Taking full advantage of the convenience of disk media such as eliminating the need to rewind as with videotape cassettes provides viewers with a comfortable HDTV experience with a level of simplicity and convenience that goes beyond VCRs.

These products provide even greater compatibility with the AQUOS LCD TV, including equipping them with the highly rated AQUOS Fami-Link that enables simple operation based on connecting AQUOS LCD TVs and AQUOS Audio Systems, and developing color options.

AQUOS Blu-ray Disc Recorders are digital video recorders for the 21st century based on a completely new concept that enables users to readily enjoy recording and playing back HDTV with simple, easy operation like the VCRs that people are already familiar with using.

Source: Sharp

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