Scientists discover new subatomic particle

February 26, 2016

Physicists have discovered a new elementary particle—the latest member to be added to the exotic species known as tetraquarks. 

The discovery was made by scientists – including Lancaster's Professor Iain Bertram - involved in the DZero international collaboration at Fermilab, the US Government's laboratory specialising in high-energy particle physics.

Professor Bertram said: "It is exciting to discover a new and unusual particle that will help us understand the strong interaction- one of the four known fundamental interactions in physics." 

DZero is one of two experiments at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Although the Tevatron was retired in 2011, the experiments continue to analyse billions of previously recorded events from its collisions. 

The tetraquark observation came as a surprise when DZero scientists first saw hints in July 2015 of the new particle, called X(5568), named for its mass—5568 megaelectronvolts.

Professor Bertram worked on the analysis, developing the model used to simulate the X(5568). 

Quarks are point-like elementary that typically come in packages of two or three, the most familiar of which are the proton and neutron (each is made of three quarks). 

There are six types, or "flavours," of quark to choose from: up, down, strange, charm, bottom and top. Each of these also has an antimatter counterpart.

While all other observed tetraquarks contain at least two of the same flavor, X(5568) has four different flavors -  up, down, strange and bottom.

Explore further: Fermilab's CDF observes Omega-sub-b baryon

More information: "Observation of a new Bs0π± state" paper FERMILAB-PUB-16-038-E. arXiv:1602.07588 [hep-ex]

Related Stories

Fermilab's CDF observes Omega-sub-b baryon

June 29, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- At a recent physics seminar at the Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Fermilab physicist Pat Lukens of the CDF experiment announced the observation of a new particle, the Omega-sub-b ...

Tevatron experiments close in on favored Higgs mass range

July 21, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Experiments at the Department of Energy’s Fermilab are close to reaching the critical sensitivity that is necessary to look for the existence of a light Higgs particle. Scientists from both the CDF and ...

Scientists complete the top quark puzzle

February 24, 2014

Scientists on the CDF and DZero experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have announced that they have found the final predicted way of creating a top quark, completing a picture ...

First joint result from LHC and Tevatron experiments

March 19, 2014

(Phys.org) —Scientists working on the world's leading particle collider experiments have joined forces, combined their data and produced the first joint result from Fermilab's Tevatron and CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), ...

Recommended for you

Understanding nature's patterns with plasmas

August 23, 2016

Patterns abound in nature, from zebra stripes and leopard spots to honeycombs and bands of clouds. Somehow, these patterns form and organize all by themselves. To better understand how, researchers have now created a new ...

Measuring tiny forces with light

August 25, 2016

Photons are bizarre: They have no mass, but they do have momentum. And that allows researchers to do counterintuitive things with photons, such as using light to push matter around.

Light and matter merge in quantum coupling

August 22, 2016

Where light and matter intersect, the world illuminates. Where light and matter interact so strongly that they become one, they illuminate a world of new physics, according to Rice University scientists.

Stretchy supercapacitors power wearable electronics

August 23, 2016

A future of soft robots that wash your dishes or smart T-shirts that power your cell phone may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid—not ideal properties for ...

Spherical tokamak as model for next steps in fusion energy

August 24, 2016

Among the top puzzles in the development of fusion energy is the best shape for the magnetic facility—or "bottle"—that will provide the next steps in the development of fusion reactors. Leading candidates include spherical ...

27 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

El_Nose
2.3 / 5 (4) Feb 26, 2016
not a new elementary particle - its a new particle in the tetraquark family
Hyperfuzzy
2.3 / 5 (15) Feb 26, 2016
Wow, when do we stop this nonsense?
Phys1
4.7 / 5 (15) Feb 26, 2016
@en
By all definitions a new particle.
@hf
never, unless earth gets hit by a big comet or we all become religious nuts.
Whydening Gyre
4.5 / 5 (6) Feb 26, 2016
@en
By all definitions a new particle.
@hf
never, unless earth gets hit by a big comet or we all become religious nuts.

And it's beginning to look like one or the other is gonna happen...:-)
Phys1
3.8 / 5 (6) Feb 26, 2016
@WG
I am not confident that it won't.
Steve 200mph Cruiz
5 / 5 (8) Feb 26, 2016
So nose,
They didn't say that discovered a new fundamental particle, they said subatomic.
Subatomic means less than an atom, this particle is less than an atom
Achille
5 / 5 (7) Feb 26, 2016
not a new elementary particle - its a new particle in the tetraquark family

They never said it was an elementary particle, they said it is a subatomic particle.
dsmealey15
5 / 5 (5) Feb 26, 2016
not a new elementary particle - its a new particle in the tetraquark family

They never said it was an elementary particle, they said it is a subatomic particle.

ACTUALLY and i quote
"Physicists have discovered a new elementary particle—the latest member to be added to the exotic species known as tetraquarks."

They DID say that it is an elementary particle. However its actually just a different variation.

So nose,
They didn't say that discovered a new fundamental particle, they said subatomic.
Subatomic means less than an atom, this particle is less than an atom

So you're both wrong.
Gigel
4 / 5 (2) Feb 27, 2016
I wonder how they came to call 2 quarks up, down and another 2 top, bottom. They were running out of names at strange and charm anyway.
torbjorn_b_g_larsson
4.3 / 5 (6) Feb 27, 2016
"While all other observed tetraquarks contain at least two of the same flavor, X(5568) has four different flavors - up, down, strange and bottom."

What a mongrel.

But if there is no odd new symmetry in play, that would be nice since it would not complicate the standard model. Or it could be one that breaks it, which would be nice too - new physics!
HeuristicPerception
1 / 5 (3) Feb 27, 2016
@en
By all definitions a new particle.
@hf
never, unless earth gets hit by a big comet or we all become religious nuts.


pseudoscience is a religion lol
panamars
1 / 5 (4) Feb 28, 2016
ARTICLE INTERESTING
--------------------------------------

Possibly of interest ;

http://www.stefan...ies.html

http://www.stefan...UR_1.pdf
-------------------------------
http://www.stefan...PI_1.pdf
---------------------------------------------------
http://www.stefan...SIGN.pdf

Regards from Athens,
TimLong2001
1 / 5 (1) Feb 28, 2016
QED photons, a la Feynman, are sufficient. Beta pairs can single-handedly form nucleons.
Phys1
4.2 / 5 (5) Feb 28, 2016
I wonder how they came to call 2 quarks up, down and another 2 top, bottom. They were running out of names at strange and charm anyway.

See http://www.partic...ing.html
travisr
5 / 5 (1) Feb 28, 2016
Some part of me can't wait until 30 years down the road, where we're probing the insides of quarks and guffawing at our point like understanding of them today. Its Cantor Sets all the way down!
viko_mx
1 / 5 (5) Feb 29, 2016
Elementary particles are observing constantly the attempts of scientists to unravel their secrets and are laughing. People hardly understand that knowledge requires responsibility. Especially professional scientists on the payroll.
Scientists and engineers use the effects of physical laws on the physical world in their projects, but do not understand their origin. It's like driving a car without the need to understand how it its engine works. They are only users of this laws.
Stephen_Crowley
5 / 5 (2) Feb 29, 2016
Viko, very well, glad you speak for the particles, not sure what the point was
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (2) Feb 29, 2016
Some part of me can't wait until 30 years down the road, where we're probing the insides of quarks and guffawing at our point like understanding of them today. Its Cantor Sets all the way down!

And - all the way up...:-)
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (3) Feb 29, 2016
Elementary particles are observing constantly the attempts of scientists to unravel their secrets and are laughing.

Whaddaya know - they're here for the entertainment, too!
People hardly understand that knowledge requires responsibility. Especially professional scientists on the payroll.

You seem to have a real hard-on for working scientists...
Scientists and engineers use the effects of physical laws on the physical world in their projects, but do not understand their origin. It's like driving a car without the need to understand how it its engine works. They are only users of this laws.

Kinda like you and concepts?
antialias_physorg
4.1 / 5 (9) Feb 29, 2016
Some part of me can't wait until 30 years down the road, where we're probing the insides of quarks and guffawing at our point like understanding of them today. Its Cantor Sets all the way down!

However, without out prodding at quarks now we'd never get to that stage 30 years from now.
And we really don't know what we'll find then. Making pronouncement on "it will be this or that" without any reasoning to back it up is pretty pointless (and also counter-productive, as it blinds you to alternatives).

Scientists and engineers use the effects of physical laws on the physical world in their projects, but do not understand their origin.

Gee. Guess what science is all about: Finding their origin. Are you so afraid it won't be your sky fairy? Too bad for you. When it's a decision between your delusions and hard evidence evidence wins. Always.
bschott
1 / 5 (5) Feb 29, 2016
Some part of me can't wait until 30 years down the road, where we're probing the insides of quarks and guffawing at our point like understanding of them today. Its Cantor Sets all the way down!


We will never generate a "field" that can stabilize a "quark" for study. You just have to believe what you are told and trust that it is correct.
El_Nose
not rated yet Feb 29, 2016
-- i restate my original post

not a new elementary particle - its a new particle in the tetraquark family

-- and now I will clarify :( taken from wikipedia )

In particle physics, an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle whose substructure is unknown, thus it is unknown whether it is composed of other particles.[1] Known elementary particles include the fundamental fermions (quarks, leptons, antiquarks, and antileptons), which generally are "matter particles" and "antimatter particles", as well as the fundamental bosons (gauge bosons and the Higgs boson), which generally are "force particles" that mediate interactions among fermions

This by definition is a Meson i believe - and not elementary as we know it is composed of other particles... making it a composite particle.
El_Nose
not rated yet Feb 29, 2016
further clarification

- the title says subatomic particle
however the first line of the article states elementary particle
JongDan
not rated yet Mar 01, 2016
While all other observed tetraquarks contain at least two of the same flavor, X(5568) has four different flavors - up, down, strange and bottom.

How does this work? No matter how, I don't think you can balance colour charge with that.
Gigel
not rated yet Mar 01, 2016
It has two colour-anticolour pairs?
EnsignFlandry
not rated yet Mar 01, 2016
Elementary particles are observing constantly the attempts of scientists to unravel their secrets and are laughing. People hardly understand that knowledge requires responsibility. Especially professional scientists on the payroll.
Scientists and engineers use the effects of physical laws on the physical world in their projects, but do not understand their origin. It's like driving a car without the need to understand how it its engine works. They are only users of this laws.


Elementary particles are conscious? And have a sense of humor? How do you *know* this? And why do you think scientists continue to do research? That's right, to discover things.
compose
Mar 13, 2016
This comment has been removed by a moderator.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.