Supreme Court could limit software patents

Mar 31, 2014 by Sam Hananel

The Supreme Court appears willing to make it tougher to approve patents for computer software in a case that is being closely watched by technology companies.

But the justices on Monday struggled to come up with a middle ground that would recognize true inventions as opposed to those that simply take an old idea and blend it with computer wizardry.

The outcome of the case could send tremors through an industry that touches virtually every sector of the economy, from gadgets on to advances in anti-lock brakes.

The issue has divided the nation's technology giants. Companies like IBM say new restrictions could nullify thousands of existing patents. But firms including Google and Facebook say the free flow of software patents blocks other companies from innovation.

Explore further: US court case could mean doom for software patents (Update)

3 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Google buys IBM patents to beef up portfolio

Jul 30, 2011

Google has bought more than 1,000 technology patents from IBM as the Internet giant seeks to build up its portfolio and head off potential intellectual property suits.

Apple risks hefty fee in Germany patent trial

Feb 05, 2014

Apple is caught up in a new patent battle in Germany, risking a 1.5-billion-euro fine at a trial over the iPhone's emergency phone-dialling feature, the regional court of Mannheim said on Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Does your computer know how you're feeling?

Aug 22, 2014

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users' emotional states as much as 87% of the time, depending on the emotion.

Microsoft to unveil new Windows software

Aug 21, 2014

A news report out Thursday indicated that Microsoft is poised to give the world a glimpse at a new-generation computer operating system that will succeed Windows 8.

Unlocking the potential of simulation software

Aug 21, 2014

With a method known as finite element analysis (FEA), engineers can generate 3-D digital models of large structures to simulate how they'll fare under stress, vibrations, heat, and other real-world conditions.

User comments : 0