Possible evidence for dark matter particle presented

Mar 11, 2014 by Stuart Wolpert

(Phys.org) —Dark matter, the mysterious substance estimated to make up approximately more than one-quarter of the mass of the universe, is crucial to the formation of galaxies, stars and even life but has so far eluded direct observation.

At a recent UCLA symposium attended by 190 scientists from around the world, physicists presented several analyses that participants interpreted to imply the existence of a dark matter particle.

The likely mass would be approximately 30 billion electron-volts, said the symposium's organizer, David Cline, a professor of physics in the UCLA College of Letters and Science and one of the world's experts on dark matter.

The physicists at the Feb. 26–28 event were in agreement that "there seems to be an excess in the available data that could be due to dark matter," Cline said.

"At this symposium, it was obvious that excitement is building in the fields of and, especially, detection," said Cline, who noted that there are several ways dark matter can be observed and that all were discussed at the UCLA meeting.

"Because dark matter makes up the bulk of the mass of galaxies and is fundamental in the formation of galaxies and stars, it is essential to the origin of life in the universe and on Earth," Cline said.

The first evidence for dark matter was discovered in 1933 using the Mt. Wilson telescope outside of Los Angeles. More recently, various theoretical models and detector improvements have made it possible to search for at extremely sensitive levels — some of the most sensitive measurements made by any scientists in the world.

One search technique involves using the vast amount of dark matter in our galaxy. The NASA Fermi Satellite Telescope, an international collaboration involving NASA, the Goddard Space Flight Center and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, searches for gamma rays — very high-energy light particles — from this dark matter.

There are models of dark matter that would allow a signal in the galactic dark matter consistent with the claims at the meeting and provide a small interaction consistent with the "null results" in the direct dark matter searches all over the world.

Much larger direct dark matter detectors are being planned in the U.S., Italy, Canada and China (including Xenon 3 Ton, LUX-ZEPLIN 7 Ton and DarkSide, which will weigh five tons). These larger detectors potentially could see a dark matter signal in the next few years, Cline said.

Dark matter is widely thought to be a kind of massive elementary particle that interacts weakly with . Physicists refer to these particles as WIMPS, for weakly interacting massive particles, and think they originated from the Big Bang. WIMPs are thought to be streaming constantly through the solar system and the Earth.

Another search method is to look for an interaction of a WIMP with xenon or argon nuclei and others (like germanium) in very low-background laboratories deep underground in Italy, the U.S., Canada, China and other countries. While these experiments have seen no signal of a WIMP above 30 billion electron volts, "there is no incompatibility with the interesting excess in the FERMI data," Cline said.

The discovery of the Higgs boson, which won the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics, plays a role in the search for dark matter, Cline said, adding that this topic was discussed in detail at the meeting. Dark matter, he said, could consist of axions, WIMPs or sterile neutrinos, all of which were discussed at the symposium.

The UCLA dark matter symposium is convened every two years; this was the 11th such meeting. Cline said he and his colleagues hope to clarify the dark matter puzzle at the 2016 symposium.

It was at this same symposium in 1998 that two groups of scientists reported that the universe is accelerating, as well as expanding, a finding Cline described as "one of the greatest discoveries in the history of science."

Explore further: Glimmer of light in the search for dark matter

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User comments : 13

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EyeNStein
1.5 / 5 (4) Mar 11, 2014
Is this a result or a preemptive bid for this years Physics Nobel?
cantdrive85
1.6 / 5 (22) Mar 11, 2014
There are models of dark matter that would allow a signal in the galactic dark matter consistent with the claims at the meeting and provide a small interaction consistent with the "null results" in the direct dark matter searches all over the world.

Ah yes, in the search for dark matter, leprechauns, and unicorns even that which falsifies supports the theory. Must be nice...
Rimino
Mar 11, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
ekim
5 / 5 (13) Mar 11, 2014
There are models of dark matter that would allow a signal in the galactic dark matter consistent with the claims at the meeting and provide a small interaction consistent with the "null results" in the direct dark matter searches all over the world.

Ah yes, in the search for dark matter, leprechauns, and unicorns even that which falsifies supports the theory. Must be nice...

Neptune was the first planet found by mathematical prediction rather than by empirical observation. Where is the math for leprechauns and unicorns.
TimLong2001
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 11, 2014
Most short-lived particles are just decay resonance states. The equal but opposite charges forming the binary photon structure actually have a mass (associated with charge) and defeats big bang theory, which requires the "defined" zero photon mass. How many more stop-gaps must be invented to justify the continuation of "universal expansion"?
gunnqu
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 11, 2014
Dark Matter and Dark Energy are Mirage
http://arxiv.org/pdf/1004.4496 "You shall not find any new physics, because all physical events are interpreted well-known particles (leptons, quarks, and gauge bosons) and forces which have long known (electroweak, gravity, strong interactions)." http://arxiv.org/...2322.pdf
Quznetsov G 2013 Logical foundation of fundamental theoretical physics (Lambert Academic Publ.)

Read more at: http://phys.org/n...html#jCp
arom
1 / 5 (5) Mar 11, 2014
Dark matter is widely thought to be a kind of massive elementary particle that interacts weakly with ordinary matter. Physicists refer to these particles as WIMPS, for weakly interacting massive particles, and think they originated from the Big Bang. WIMPs are thought to be streaming constantly through the solar system and the Earth.
….
The discovery of the Higgs boson, which won the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics, plays a role in the search for dark matter, Cline said, adding that this topic was discussed in detail at the meeting. Dark matter, he said, could consist of axions, WIMPs or sterile neutrinos, all of which were discussed at the symposium.

It is interesting to note that Higgs field (in which the Higgs boson was created from) was ignored to relate to the dark matter, while people are concentrated on some kinds of particles, and this may be the reason why it was so mysterious…
http://www.vacuum...14〈=en
Shelgeyr
1.7 / 5 (12) Mar 12, 2014
No matter how well they define the kludge, it is still a kludge.

...there are several ways dark matter can be observed...


That should be considered bare-face scientific fraud. No, there are NO ways dark matter can be observed. It can only be inferred, based on Reality(tm) not playing along with certain cosmological dogmas- excuse me, theories. It is the postulated gap-filler. It is the grant request tell-tale, the "please fund this" favored brat which makes a mockery of true science and lets pompous self-congratulating bean-counters jeer at those who insist on adherence to the scientific method and reliance upon not of just "evidence" (of which with dark matter there is none) but the higher standard of "independently testable evidence", repeatable experimentation, and hypotheses which can be verified and/or falsified.

If they were honest, they'd admit there isn't any functional difference between the "science" of dark matter, and the religion of the blind and deaf Demiurge.
Bonia
Mar 12, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
AmritSorli
2.6 / 5 (5) Mar 12, 2014
this search for dark matter and dark energy makes no much sense. Physics has forgotten on existence of electromagnetic quantum vacuum of QED.....which energy is dark energy itself.......
DarkHorse66
4 / 5 (4) Mar 12, 2014
Er, Zeph, your comment about Neptune (and the quote you used) belongs in the other thread:
http://phys.org/n...nts.html
not this one...
Regards, DH66
11791
Mar 12, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
theon
2 / 5 (4) Mar 17, 2014
These nonsense announcements should be made so often that everybody gets stomachaches. Meanwhile, serious people can read works of Pavel Kroupa (not me) who argues on the basis of observation of dwarf galaxies that the WIMP idea is completely ruled out.
Zachia
1 / 5 (1) Mar 17, 2014
@theon: Kroupa is censored hardly, it seems...;-)
Q-Star
3 / 5 (2) Mar 17, 2014
@theon: Kroupa http://www.scilog...science, it seems...;-)


That is a new record for a resurrection even for ya Zeph.
Zachia
1 / 5 (3) Mar 17, 2014
This is important only for trolls, who are making social club from PO discussions.