Moisture-buffering plaster sucks up water vapour

February 3, 2014
Moisture-buffering plaster sucks up water vapour
The moisture absorbing capacity of the novel Empa rendering system in comparison with competing products – the so-called "Nordtest."

Water vapour generated by cooking, taking a shower or drying damp clothes can condense on cold walls, encouraging the growth of mildew and microbes. The company Sto AG, in collaboration with Empa, has developed a special wall plaster to deal with this problem. Its ability to absorb moisture from the air is significantly better than that of conventional lime plaster.

Empa researcher Thomas Stahl developed the new buffering plaster together with Sto AG.

The new wall plaster that Empa building physicist Thomas Stahl was looking for needed to be regulating, mineral-based, easy to use and not much more expensive than alternative products. The newly developed moisture-buffering plaster can in fact absorb 90 g of per square meter, measured by the standardized "Nordtest" method. This exceeds the capacity of the best clay rendering, measured for comparison purposes, by about 30 per cent.

No more condensing water on thermal bridges

The health and economic advantages offered by a relatively stable are enormous. Occupants and furnishings are less stressed, and energy consumption (and therefore heating costs) drops because dry can be brought to a comfortable room temperature more quickly.

In order to achieve the required level of humidity storage capacity, the moisture-buffering plaster has to be applied with a thickness of 1 to 2 cm. This significantly reduces the risk of water vapour condensing on cold areas of the wall and on thermal bridges. The moisture absorbing draws in the excess humidity from the room air and stores it, releasing it back to the environment hours later. The room - for example a windowless bathroom - only need be aired and then warmed up again.

Explore further: Antibacterial plaster could put a clean sheen on walls

Related Stories

Antibacterial plaster could put a clean sheen on walls

February 11, 2009

Scientists in China are reporting development and testing of new self-sanitizing plaster with more powerful antibacterial effects than penicillin. The material could be used in wall coatings, paints, art works and other products. ...

New high performance insulating plaster developed at Empa

November 22, 2010

Empa scientists have developed a high performance plaster which boasts a thermal insulation value three-times better than convention plaster thanks to so-called aerogels. The new material offers an elegant method of renovating ...

New plaster enhances wound healing

May 31, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Swiss researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a plaster that accelerates wound healing and is easily removed from the wound at any time. Burn victims in particular may profit from this invention in the future.

New Aerogel-based plaster provides better insulation

August 21, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Old buildings are beautiful – and hard to insulate. Empa and the Swiss render manufacturer Fixit AG together developed a new Aerogel-based plaster that provides twice the insulation of currently used insulating ...

New method measures mercury vapour for the first time

January 31, 2014

Empa has conducted an investigation to find out how much mercury energy-saving lamps contain and if this is within legal requirements. Altogether, 75 commercially available lamps were tested, with encouraging results – ...

Recommended for you

Facebook ready to test giant drone for Internet service

July 30, 2015

Facebook says it will begin test flights later this year for a solar-powered drone with a wingspan as big as a Boeing 737, in the next stage of its campaign to deliver Internet connectivity to remote parts of the world.

Power grid forecasting tool reduces costly errors

July 30, 2015

Accurately forecasting future electricity needs is tricky, with sudden weather changes and other variables impacting projections minute by minute. Errors can have grave repercussions, from blackouts to high market costs. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.