Apple, Samsung fail to settle before March trial

Feb 22, 2014
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Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. have failed to settle their latest patent dispute despite a daylong meeting between top Samsung executives and Apple CEO Tim Cook hosted by a mediator earlier this month.

The companies detailed the lack of progress in a Friday. Judge Lucy Lucy Koh of the U.S. District Court in San Jose has been pushing the two sides to settle the 2-year-old case.

While the two sides said they remain willing to work through a mediator, the lack of a settlement points them toward a trial in March.

The world's top two smartphone makers have waged legal battles over mobile devices since Apple accused Samsung of copying the iPhone and the iPad in 2011. Later, Samsung claimed Apple used its technologies without permissions, expanding battles to courts in Asia, Europe and North America.

In November, a Silicon Valley jury tacked on damages that a previous jury said Samsung owes Apple for copying vital iPhone and iPad features, bringing the total award to $930 million.

The previous verdict covered 13 older Samsung devices. Samsung has said it would appeal.

The latest trial will consider Apple's claims that Samsung's newest devices, such as its Galaxy S III, also copied Apple's technology.

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