Tomb of ancient Egyptian beer brewer unearthed

Jan 03, 2014
This image released by the Supreme Council of Antiquities shows colored inscriptions on a newly discovered tomb in Luxor, Egypt, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014. Egypt's minister of antiquities said Japanese archeologists have unearthed the tomb of an ancient beer brewer in the city of Luxor that is more than 3,000 years old. (AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities)

(AP)—Egypt's minister of antiquities says Japanese archeologists have unearthed the tomb of an ancient beer brewer in the city of Luxor that is more than 3,000 years old.

Mohammed Ibrahim says Friday the tomb dates back to the Ramesside period and belongs to the chief "maker of beer for gods of the dead" who was also the head of a warehouse. He added that the walls of the tomb's chambers contain "fabulous designs and colors, reflecting details of daily life ... along with their ."

This image released by the Supreme Council of Antiquities shows colored inscriptions on a newly discovered tomb in Luxor, Egypt, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014. Egypt's minister of antiquities said Japanese archeologists have unearthed the tomb of an ancient beer brewer in the city of Luxor that is more than 3,000 years old. (AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities)

The head of the Japanese team, Jiro Kondo, says the tomb was discovered during work near another tomb belonging to a statesmen under Amenhotep III, grandfather of the famed boy-pharaoh Tutankhamun.

Explore further: Dig unearths 4,000 year old tomb of doctor to pharaohs

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EnricM
not rated yet Jan 04, 2014
"maker of beer for gods of the dead"

Oh, they already had extreme metal bars back then ? \m/
thingumbobesquire
not rated yet Jan 05, 2014
I guess this disproves that sodden song "In heaven there is no beer."

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