App Watch: Query your human network with Jelly

Jan 09, 2014 by Barbara Ortutay
This undated photo provided by Jelly, shows Biz Stone. Stone, a twitter co-founder seeks to prove that no matter how sophisticated computer algorithms become, "they are still no match for the experience, inventiveness, and creativity of the human mind. (AP Photo/Jelly)

Jelly is an app for when you walk by a tree and want to know what type of tree it is, so you snap a photo of it and ask your Facebook and Twitter friends.

Jelly is an for when you wonder if you should trim your beard, so you snap a photo of said beard and ask your Facebook and Twitter friends.

It's an app for asking what sights you should see during your next vacation in Budapest and Bratislava (ask Jelly if you're wondering where that is). It's an app to take a photo of a bottle of Knob Creek bourbon and ask people whether you should drink some if you have a sore throat.

Jelly comes from Twitter Inc. co-founder Biz Stone, who unveiled the app this week.

___

— HOW IT WORKS

Download the free Jelly app on your iPhone or Android mobile device. It's easier to find by searching "Jelly Industries." Connect the app to your Facebook and Twitter accounts.

To ask a question, take a photo, use one you've already taken or find one in Google images. Ask away. The query will go to people in your Facebook and Twitter networks, provided they also use Jelly. Your friends can also forward your question to their non-Jelly friends.

To answer questions, tap the icon on the top left. Questions will appear one by one. You can swipe the question away forever, star it to see what other people say, answer it or forward it your non-Jelly network.

___

— BUT WHY?

Sure, you could do all this on existing social networks, or on services such as Quora, which lets users query people with first-hand experience. In fact, I got advice on reviving a dead plant simply by posting an image on my regular Facebook feed.

But Jelly extends your network by pulling in information not just from people you know, but the people they know.

Stone says Jelly seeks to prove that no matter how sophisticated computer algorithms become, "they are still no match for the experience, inventiveness, and creativity of the human mind."

___

— HANDS ON

In the few hours I spent trying Jelly, I asked a half-serious question wondering when our office bathroom's hot water will be turned back on and got some half-serious feedback. It was fun to answer someone's question about what to do in Budapest, where I'm from. I sent a couple of answers and got a note back saying "Thanks!"

I don't see using Jelly every day, but I'm not deleting it either. It could come in handy while bird watching, walking around a new city and, well, who knows.

Explore further: Twitter co-founder launches app for asking about what you see

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Enhanced royal jelly produces jumbo queen bee larvae

Jul 18, 2012

Scientists have discovered a way to make worker bees produce an enhanced version of royal jelly (RJ) – the super-nutritious substance that dictates whether larvae become workers or queens, and that is ...

New mobile app, ShoeBox, helps scan old photos

Nov 02, 2011

(AP) -- A new smartphone app will help you transition your old paper photos into the digital age. Called ShoeBox, the free app lets you use your iPhone's camera as a photo scanner.

Facebook says 'simple' app used by 100 million

Jul 22, 2013

US social network giant Facebook said Monday it has surpassed 100 million users a month using an application designed for "simple" mobile phones widely used in developing nations.

Recommended for you

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

8 hours ago

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Android gains in US, basic phones almost extinct

Apr 18, 2014

The Google Android platform grabbed the majority of mobile phones in the US market in early 2014, as consumers all but abandoned non-smartphone handsets, a survey showed Friday.

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

Apr 17, 2014

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.