Samsung sells 110-inch ultra-HD TV for $150,000 (Update)

Dec 30, 2013 by Youkyung Lee
In this undated handout photo released by Samsung Electronics Co. Monday, Dec. 30, 2103, models pose with a Samsung Electronics' 110-inch UHD TV. Samsung on Monday said a 110-inch UHD TV that has four times the resolution of standard high-definition TVs is going on sales for about $150,000 in South Korea. (AP Photo/Samsung Electronics Co.)

Samsung said a 110-inch TV that has four times the resolution of standard high-definition TVs is going on sale for about $150,000 in South Korea.

The launch Monday of the giant television set reflects global TV makers' move toward ultra HD TVs, as manufacturing bigger TVs using OLED proves too costly.

Last year, Samsung and rival LG Electronics, the world's top two TV makers, touted OLED as the future of TV. OLED screens are ultrathin and can display images with enhanced clarity and deeper color saturation.

But Samsung and LG failed to make OLED TVs a mainstream that would replace the LCD television sets and still struggling to mass produce larger and affordable TVs with OLED. Meanwhile, Japanese media reported last week that Sony Corp. and Panasonic Corp. decided to end their OLED partnership.

Demand for U-HD TVs is expected to rise despite dearth of content while its price will likely come down faster than that of the OLED TVs. Much of the growth is forecast to come from China, a major market for the South Korean TV makers. Chinese TV makers have been making a push into the U-HD TV market as well.

According to NPD DisplaySearch, global sales of ultra-HD TV sets will surge from 1.3 million this year to 23 million in 2017. More than half of the shipments will be taken by Chinese companies between 2013 and 2017, according to NPD.

In this undated handout photo released by Samsung Electronics Co. Monday, Dec. 30, 2103, models pose with a Samsung Electronics' 110-inch UHD TV. Samsung on Monday said a 110-inch UHD TV that has four times the resolution of standard high-definition TVs is going on sales for about $150,000 in South Korea. (AP Photo/Samsung Electronics Co.)

While Chinese TV makers have been seeking to boost sales of U-HD TVs with a lower price and a smaller size, Samsung's strategy is to go bigger with a higher price tag. Samsung's 110-inch U-HD TV measures 2.6 meters by 1.8 meters. It will be available in China, the Middle East and Europe. In South Korea, the TV is priced at 160 million won ($152,000) while prices in other countries vary.

Samsung said it received 10 orders for the latest premium TVs from the Middle East. Previously, the largest U-HD TV made by Samsung was 85-inch measured diagonally.

The ultra-HD TVs are also known as "4K" because they contain four times more pixels than an HD TV.

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tscati
4 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2013
why?
Mike_Massen
not rated yet Dec 30, 2013
Although I wouldn't buy one (yet), I have met some who would be ok to pay that sort of money for a high profile display - prob 500mm above floor across the wall. At Burswood casino (Perth) few years ago they bought a 60inch 720P for $73,000 - for a casino that makes profit after tax for one of their shareholders of some $15 million a year it was a cool means to draw crowds. Of course actuarial tables for this exist.

A $150,000 TV of the Samsung's size *&* arrayed also for a large billboard type display where there is suitable (lack of) lighting in a high traffic area could well pay for itself in less than 15 months. Have seen the numbers where one shop alone in such an area selling alcohol turns over some $60,000 per week, not hard to justify certain types of visual displays - question will be what sort of enticement &content - which is going to be more important for a time - well until AI generated scripts starting appearing widely in 5 years or so... ;-)

Cheers
Noumenon
1 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2013
It will be interesting to see what 4k is like. Is there any noticeable difference verses 1080p? Perhaps only with large screens and video? In the mean time i'll keep my 73" 1080i.

The prices are ridiculously exponential. You can get a 90" 1080p for $7,000 and a 80" 1080p for less than $4,000.
Milou
not rated yet Dec 30, 2013
Now, one can spend $150,000 and watch all the crap on TV in super duper, HD, HQ, yati yata.... Too bad, the problem with entertainment is not the hardware. It is content. This TV will bring out the greatest idiots in our society.
Zephir_fan
Dec 30, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
kris2lee
3 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2013
@Noumenon I saw one in the local super markets TV section, it was not that big but also did not cost a big fortune, only small one (around €20 000).

The picture quality really was astonishing even when standing next to it.
Noumenon
1 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2013
In the mean time i'll keep my 73" 1080i.


What are you going to do when your mom quits paying the cable bill or gives the tv back to her boyfriend the Obama-man?


What?
Zephir_fan
Dec 30, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Zenmaster
not rated yet Dec 30, 2013
"The ultra-HD TVs are also known as "4K" because they contain four times more pixels than an HD TV." UHD does happen to have 4x the pixels, but 4K is shorthand for ~4000, as in 4000 horizontal pixels.
FainAvis
not rated yet Dec 30, 2013
"The Consumer Electronics Association announced on October 17, 2012, that "Ultra High-Definition", or "Ultra HD", would be used for displays that have an aspect ratio of at least 16:9 and at least one digital input capable of carrying and presenting native video at a minimum resolution of 3,840 × 2,160 pixels." (Wikipedia)
alfie_null
not rated yet Jan 01, 2014
It seems at some point, perfecting a process of seamlessly plugging together arrays of smaller displays would make sense. The market for $150000 displays is minuscule. Bragging rights, but not much money to be made.
tonywalker954
not rated yet Feb 01, 2014
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Gmr
not rated yet Feb 02, 2014
This just sounds like hopeful marketing fluff. Dissing OLED television technology - for very very large applications - sounds like somebody doesn't want to go to that market. And maybe is pinning their hopes on keeping LCD tech investments protected.