Pulses immobilize cars with RF Safe-Stop from e2v

Dec 04, 2013 by Nancy Owano weblog

(Phys.org) —A UK company's prototype has shown how cars can be immobilized by blasting electromagnetic waves. RF Safe-Stop is a system that stops engines. Its ability to send electronic pulses out towards targeted vehicles forces those vehicles' engines to cut out. As a non-lethal weapon, the unit can disable the engines of not only cars but also small boats, doing the job, in just seconds, at a distance up to 50m. One suggested defense use, in temporarily disabling a vehicle's electronic systems, would be to thwart drivers using their vehicles as car bombs as well as to defend sensitive locations from cars that refuse to stop.

A recent report from the BBC said there has also been a show of police interest in the device, which is made by the UK-based e2v. a company that designs, develops and manufactures technology systems and components. The BBC was recently given a demo of the device at an airfield in Worcestershire. In the demo, a car drove towards the device at around 15mph. As it entered the RF-Safe-Stop range, the car's warning lights and dials showed . The engine stopped. The rolled to a halt. As part of the event, e2v assembled a varied group of not only cars but also motorbikes, to test the device against a range of vehicles. The intense RF pulses-are designed to immobilize the management system of a 's engine; the aim is to "confuse" the electronics and render them temporarily inoperable. According to product manager Andy Wood, 17 nations and five UK government bodies have shown interest in e2v's technology.

The system can be adapted for various applications. Wood told The Engineer that RF Safe-Stop could be fitted into fixed-based installations and boats and that there were blueprint ideas to integrate it into a helicopter.

The company's RF Safe-Stop flyer states that demonstration hardware developed by the company has had proven effects for engine-stopping and disruption via the company's patented switching products in conjunction with high-power magnetrons, "and carefully packaging these with appropriate antennas." The company notes that its design approach has enabled a solution that can be adapted to suit specific customer needs. Listing application areas for its RF Safe-Stop technology, the e2v includes checkpoint enforcement and, at sea, harbor entry protection and anti-piracy.

Explore further: GM says almost-driverless cars coming by 2020

More information:www.e2v.com/e2v/assets/File/RF… 2pp_V8_AW_LOWRES.pdf
www.theengineer.co.uk/military… -50m/1017308.article
www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25197786

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ThomasQuinn
2.3 / 5 (6) Dec 04, 2013
I would like to know what effect these strong pulses have on organic tissue and particularly organs. They say "non-lethal", but they say nothing about injuries.
ab3a
4 / 5 (4) Dec 04, 2013
Side effect:: the driver's eyes develop cataracts (that's usually the first documented effect from this level of RF radiation).

I suggest that this not be used casually.

Also, while I'm sure it will disturb the ignition systems of gasoline engines, I have to wonder if it would have any significant effect against a diesel engine.
Tetsugaku
2.3 / 5 (6) Dec 04, 2013
Easily defeated with hardened electronics. So you set up a very expensive system, expect it to work, and it's defeated by a few hundred dollars of illicit upgrades to the vehicle.
Tetsugaku
1 / 5 (5) Dec 04, 2013
Side effect:: the driver's eyes develop cataracts (that's usually the first documented effect from this level of RF radiation).

I suggest that this not be used casually.

Also, while I'm sure it will disturb the ignition systems of gasoline engines, I have to wonder if it would have any significant effect against a diesel engine.


Wow, I've never heard of such low energy radiation causing cataracts. Do you have a source for that? I'd be very interested to see the biological mechanism behind that. Thanks!
PPihkala
2.5 / 5 (2) Dec 04, 2013
Low tech (read old) diesels can be run without electricity, but modern ones are computer controlled. Also when the mode of operation is known, there will be countermeasures to keep systems running, when people want to prevent being stopped by these means. Analogy: gunsfire can stop normal people, but not ones wearing protective gear like bulletproof vests.
ab3a
5 / 5 (3) Dec 04, 2013
Wow, I've never heard of such low energy radiation causing cataracts. Do you have a source for that? I'd be very interested to see the biological mechanism behind that. Thanks!


The article is devoid of facts. We don't know how much power they're talking about.

However, most cars are designed to handle a two way radio running power levels of up to 100 Watts. The level of radiation there is not small. To get to a power level that can reliably stop a car or truck, you'll need quite a bit of energy.

You could pulse it, but the pulses would have to be rather extreme. I stand by my earlier statement. Again, the risks to the driver are not negligible. I say this as a ham radio enthusiast with 45 years of experience, and as an electrical engineer with extensive experience working around RF.

I don't see how you can claim that it is such a low energy.
Humpty
1.6 / 5 (7) Dec 04, 2013
Points and coil ignition - problem solved.
alfie_null
not rated yet Dec 05, 2013
Points and coil ignition - problem solved.

You forgot to mention the time machine.
Tetsugaku
1 / 5 (3) Dec 05, 2013
The article is devoid of facts. We don't know how much power they're talking about.


Then why speculate about biological effects? Since it's not ionizing radiation it would mean the only way it can effect human tissue is by thermal mechanisms. I doubt a lot of heating can be done in a short pulse, but I could be wrong.

However, most cars are designed to handle a two way radio running power levels of up to 100 Watts. The level of radiation there is not small.


A Watt is not a measure of radiation intensity or magnitude.

Again, the risks to the driver are not negligible.


How can you possibly say that without either the frequency, duration, or intensity of the RF in question?

I don't see how you can claim that it is such a low energy.


RF absolutely IS low level radiation (or more accurately low frequency). Here's how I can say it;

http://en.wikiped...adiation
ForFreeMinds
1 / 5 (3) Dec 07, 2013
One wonders what effects such a pulse would have on those with heart pacemakers or other electronics for their life/health who might be in the vicinity. It appears this is a new technology that could be used to kill those using electronic technology to survive. How far away would a hospital have to be, to be unaffected?
socean
1 / 5 (1) Dec 07, 2013
I hope this works against Amazon's drones.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Dec 10, 2013
Yeah drones... planes... police copters... bullet trains... annoying lawn mowers... many possibilities come to mind.
_etabeta_
not rated yet Dec 12, 2013
This is SURELY not going to work on any diesel engine that has an old-fashioned mechanical fuel injection pump. In this case the only thing that is electrical is a solenoid that must be activated to stop the engine; this device is totally useless in this case.