Teleportation with engineered quantum systems

Sep 12, 2013
Teleportation with engineered quantum systems
Superconducting quantum circuit used to relay quantum information. Credit: Y. Liu, ETH Zurich

A team of University of Queensland physicists has transmitted an atom from one location to another inside an electronic chip.

The team, which includes Dr Arkady Fedorov and Dr Matthias Baur from UQ's ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems and the School of Mathematics and Physics, published its findings in Nature this month.

Dr Fedorov said the team had achieved quantum teleportation for the first time, which could lead to larger electronic networks and more functional .

"This is a process by which can be transmitted from one place to another without sending a physical carrier of information," Dr Fedorov said.

"In this process the information just appears at the destination, almost like teleportation used in the famous science fiction series Star Trek."

Dr Fedorov said the key resource of quantum teleportation was a special type of correlation, called entanglement, shared between a sender and a receiver.

"Once entanglement is created, this 'impossible' information transfer becomes in fact possible thanks to laws of ," Dr Fedorov said.

"For the first time, the stunning process of has now been used in a circuit to relay information from one corner of the sample to the other.

"What makes our work interesting is the system uses a circuit, much like modern .

"In our system the quantum information is stored in artificial structures called , and you can even see them with your bare eyes.

"This is surprising because people typically expect quantum only at atomic scales, not even visible with electronic microscopes.

"This quantum information allows us to do teleportation with impressive speed and accuracy above what has been achievable to date."

"In our Superconducting Quantum Devices laboratory at UQ we are using this technology to further enhance our knowledge about the ," Dr Fedorov said.

"Eventually this technology will be used to create more powerful devices."

This research indicates that questions relating to the physics of quantum communication can be addressed using electronic circuits at microwave frequencies.

"One may even foresee future experiments in which quantum information will be distributed over larger distances directly by microwave to optical interfaces for quantum communication," Dr Fedorov said.

Teleportation is expected to find applications in secure communication and in more efficient information processing based on the laws of quantum physics.

EQuS aims to initiate the Quantum Era in the 21st century by engineering designer .

Through focused and visionary research, EQuS will deliver new scientific insights and fundamentally new technical capabilities across a range of disciplines.

Impacts of this work will improve the lives of Australians and people all over the world by producing breakthroughs in physics, engineering, chemistry, biology and medicine.

Explore further: Quantum physics just got less complicated

More information: Steffen, L. et al. (2013) Deterministic quantum teleportation with feed-forward in a solid state system, Nature 500, 319-322. www.nature.com/nature/journal/… ull/nature12422.html

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User comments : 7

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xrayrrman
1.8 / 5 (5) Sep 12, 2013
It seems that this could be used for communication of commands give for spacecraft. It would greatly reduce the time lag to control rovers on Mars. If not instantly. Controlling a rover in realtime would but a game changer.
AdamCC
4 / 5 (4) Sep 12, 2013
@xrayrrman, unfortunately, this is not the instantaneous transmittal of information. The article does not do a great job of explaining the subtleties. This IS important, especially wrt secure data transfer, but it does not violate the speed of light (which does and will hold for information transfer). Our communication with satellites, rovers, etc. is already speed of light. To my knowledge, this wouldn't necessarily help with bandwidth, error rate, interference etc. but on that part I could be mistaken.
xrayrrman
not rated yet Sep 12, 2013
Thanks for clearing that up for me. I'm still foggy as to the "Spooky action at a distance". I thought that was what they were trying to acheive.
vacuum-mechanics
1.4 / 5 (9) Sep 12, 2013
"Once entanglement is created, this 'impossible' information transfer becomes in fact possible thanks to laws of quantum mechanics," Dr Fedorov said.


Maybe not until we could understand how it work.

"In our Superconducting Quantum Devices laboratory at UQ we are using this technology to further enhance our knowledge about the quantum nature," Dr Fedorov said.

The problem is we still do not know how the quantum nature work at the basic principle, such as something like this mechanism….

http://www.vacuum...19〈=en

Lischyn
1.8 / 5 (5) Sep 12, 2013
"Once entanglement is created, this 'impossible' information transfer becomes in fact possible thanks to laws of quantum mechanics," Dr Fedorov said.


Maybe not until we could understand how it work.

"In our Superconducting Quantum Devices laboratory at UQ we are using this technology to further enhance our knowledge about the quantum nature," Dr Fedorov said.

The problem is we still do not know how the quantum nature work at the basic principle, such as something like this mechanism….

http://www.vacuum...19〈=en


ya well, we don't know anything about the basic principle of magnitism either but we still use it...... a lot
Osiris1
1 / 5 (3) Sep 19, 2013
Just 'saying it is so does not a fact make, no matter how loud or obnoxious the pathoskeptic that says it, or how many 'friends' he/she has to 'back up' the same lie. If teleportation is outside Einstein, the truth will eventually out. I bet that Chinese scientists are a bit more open minded about scientific matters. They do not have to be lapdogs for some westerner, so if we are of the 'none are so blind as those who will not see' type, it will be at our peril someday. On that day, the skeptiks that put us behind the eightball will run and hide.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Sep 19, 2013
Thanks for clearing that up for me. I'm still foggy as to the "Spooky action at a distance". I thought that was what they were trying to acheive.

It is, But for that to work what you still have to do is
a) entangle to entities (with an UNKNOWN state)
b) separate them and bring them to two destinations (at sub light speeds)
c) then, if you measure the entangled property of one of them you know the property of the other

The UNKNOWN is key, as if you can't transmit meaningful messages if you don't know what state you prepare the entities in - so, as AdamCC points out, no information transmission.
(If you were to measure one to have a KNOWN state then you'd break the entaglement)

However you can use this for secure encryption/decryption. (Note that encryption/decryption does not add information to a signal and hence this does not violate the prohibition on transmitting information faster than light.)

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