Tablet computers replace traditional textbooks in a Finnish school

Sep 09, 2013
Tablet computers replace traditional textbooks in a Finnish school
Tablet computers in a classroom.

This autumn, the schoolbags of pupils attending the Savonlinna Teacher Training School of the University of Eastern Finland are much lighter than before, thanks to tablet computers. Approximately half of the school's pupils and teachers now use personal tablet computers instead of traditional textbooks. The project includes a group of first graders who began their school path this autumn, as well as all of the school's seventh grade students. The seventh graders continuing to general upper secondary level will be among the first Finnish students to complete their matriculation examinations electronically.

The purpose of this extensive experiment is to move from traditional textbooks to materials and tools, and to develop school pedagogy and learning from the viewpoint of the digital age information society.

"In similar projects carried out earlier, traditional textbooks still played an important role. However, we now want to take real steps to prepare for the changes the traditional print industry. The purpose of this three-year experiment is to take the school as a whole to the digital age," says Dr Mikko Ripatti, Headmaster of the Savonlinna Teacher Training School.

The new pedagogy is built around two leading principles: Firstly, the time used for formal teaching should be decreased and, respectively, the time used for individual learning increased. This calls for a problem-based approach in teaching, co-teaching and collaboration, and planning skills. Secondly, the traditional boundaries of the classroom have expanded beyond the classroom walls both physically and virtually. This means that versatile and critical information skills and are becoming of key importance for learning.

At the moment, Finnish publishers do not offer for the grades 1–9, and the school has acquired various programmes and apps for the purposes of teaching. The teachers can also either independently or together with their install a variety of programmes on the tablets.

Explore further: Scots' inventions are fuel for independence debate

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

weLearn application supports learning

Dec 14, 2012

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a free e-learning application called weLearn for Android tablets. The easy-to-use cloud service is designed to support and enliven learning by expanding the learning ...

Digital tablets improve classroom learning

Jun 27, 2013

(Phys.org) —Using digital tablets for classroom learning activities improves understanding of topics, digital skills, creativity, independent learning and motivation. This is the opinion of 87% of the teachers who, in 2012-2013, ...

Time-poor parents go digital to communicate

Apr 16, 2013

Teachers are turning to twitter, blogging and Facebook as a way of keeping in touch with parents about their child's learning, and according to QUT education expert Associate Professor Margaret Lloyd it is ...

Schools shift from textbooks to tablets

Mar 06, 2013

(AP)—Schools no longer have to wait for textbook companies to print new editions to get the latest events. In some cases, it's as simple as a teacher hitting "refresh."

Music lessons enhance the quality of school life

Sep 02, 2013

A new study, published in Music Education Research, examined whether an extended music education had an impact on pupils' experienced satisfaction with the school. Nearly a thousand pupils at ten Finnish schools with extended ...

Recommended for you

Scots' inventions are fuel for independence debate

15 hours ago

What has Scotland ever done for us? Plenty, it turns out. The land that gave the world haggis and tartan has produced so much more, from golf and television to Dolly the Sheep and "Grand Theft Auto."

White House backs use of body cameras by police

Sep 16, 2014

Requiring police officers to wear body cameras is one potential solution for bridging deep mistrust between law enforcement and the public, the White House said, weighing in on a national debate sparked by the shooting of ...

Chinese city creates cellphone sidewalk lane

Sep 15, 2014

Taking a cue from an American TV program, the Chinese city of Chongqing has created a smartphone sidewalk lane, offering a path for those too engrossed in messaging and tweeting to watch where they're going.

Coroner: Bitcoin exchange CEO committed suicide

Sep 15, 2014

A Singapore Coroner's Court has found that the American CEO of a virtual currency exchange committed suicide earlier this year in Singapore because of work and personal issues.

User comments : 0