Google buys Bump app for sharing smartphone files

Sep 16, 2013
A woman chooses Google Search on her tablet on May 13, 2013 in the French western city of Rennes.

The startup behind popular smartphone apps for sharing contacts, pictures or other data by "bumping" smartphones together announced on Monday that it has been bought by Google.

Bump Technologies co-founder and chief David Lieb did not disclose terms of the deal bringing his team into the Google fold but leaving its popular Bump and Flock applications available to users.

"We couldn't be more thrilled to join Google," Lieb said in a message at the Bump website.

"Bump and Flock will continue to work as they always have for now; stay tuned for future updates."

The technology website AllThingsD reported the deal was worth between $30 million and $60 million.

The Bump application lets smartphone users easily share data by gently knocking knuckles while holding devices.

Flock software taps into smartphone location- to note when friends are in proximity of one another and lets them contribute to sets of photos reflecting shared experiences such as a concerts or sporting events.

"Our mission at Bump has always been to build the simplest tools for sharing the information you care about with other people and devices," Lieb said.

"We strive to create experiences that feel like magic, enabled behind the scene with innovations in math, , and algorithms."

Founded in 2008, venture-backed Bump Technologies is based in the Silicon Valley city of Mountain View, which is also home to Google.

"The Bump team has demonstrated a strong ability to quickly build and develop products that users love, and we think they'll be a great fit at Google," the Internet titan said in an email response to an AFP inquiry.

Explore further: Snapchat value soars along with number of 'snaps'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New iPhone app works by bump, not touch

Apr 08, 2009

It is somehow fitting that University of Chicago business school students would develop an iPhone app that works by bump, not touch, on Apple's famed screen. After all, it was a former U of C professor, President Barack ...

Google buys smartphone photo app maker Nik

Sep 17, 2012

Google on Monday announced that it bought the company behind photo-sharing application Snapseed in a move evidently aimed at countering Facebook's acquisition of Instagram.

Google+ adds online groups startup Fridge

Jul 22, 2011

Online groups startup Fridge said Thursday it has been bought by Google and will become part of the Internet giant's freshly-launched social network.

Recommended for you

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

10 hours ago

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

13 hours ago

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.