Tynker brings programming lessons into the home

Aug 12, 2013 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org) —Tynker announced last week that its educational system for teaching programming to students in elementary and middle schools will take on a new offering, and it is now for home use too. The Tynker for Home system arrives on the heels of Tynker for Schools, which was launched in April as a ready to use curriculum. The courses teach programming skills and computational thinking. Students are exposed to the problem-solving process, knowing how to use computing tools and taking steps needed to solve problems.

Tynker's lessons in the school can introduce the fundamentals in grades three to eight along with teacher lesson plans, email and telephone support. The system, according to Tynker, has been put to use in "hundreds" of schools. This visual programming platform allows students to learn at their own pace and the teacher extends one on one attention. While intended for students starting at grade three, the company web site makes note that there is no right age to learn how to code, only stages that can be recommended as levels of readiness where students are able to read, write, and understand relationships between cause and effect.

The company founders built the system as a browser-based platform written with Open Web standards such as JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS3. The system has character editors and other tools. The company attributes its inspiration from Scratch, launched in 2009 as a for teaching young people, especially ages eight to 16, how to create their own stories, games, and animations. Scratch was launched as a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab.

To come up with the Tynker home edition, Tynker CEO Krishna Vedati, turned to David McFarland, Portland, Oregon-based web developer and author of O'Reilly's "The Missing Manual" series on Dreamweaver, JavaScript and CSS. He also teaches at Portland State University.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

The result is an "Introduction to Programming" course. If a child were told a weekend morning would be spent learning vector drawing, encapsulating code, and absolute positioning, the child would think this was some sort of punishment, like a time out in a corner, but McFarland's course is teaching the fundamentals through such lessons as Train the Dog, Robot Defense, and TynkerBlocks. The self-paced course is designed for children in fourth through eighth grades and costs $50 per student.

The course includes use of a multimedia library with sounds, animations and scenes along with game design tools. Badges are offered at the end of each chapter; students take quizzes and solve puzzles for an assessment of what they have learned from each chapter; a final exam is tied to their earning certification of having completed the course.

Tynker's lessons for school and home use come at a time when those in the computer industry see the increase in such teaching initiatives as not as too many fingers in the pie but rather with relief that such options are increasing. Campus teams, foundations and technology executives want to see the education of children as future programmers and engineers under way, as most American elementary schools offer no introduction to programming. Many computer professionals say that computational thinking and computer programming should be part of a student's education.

Snap!, for one, is a reimplementation of BYOB (Build Your Own Blocks), a language for teaching high school and college computer science. The initiative was inspired by Scratch. Snap! is a visual, drag-and-drop programming language presented by the University of California at Berkeley. Elsewhere, Code.org has said its mission is in bringing computer science classes to every K-12 school in the United States, especially in urban and rural neighborhoods.

Explore further: Coding camps for kids rise in popularity

More information: www.tynker.com/

Press release

Related Stories

Coding camps for kids rise in popularity

Jun 25, 2013

The video game Jacob Asofsky is creating is simple: "Someone who is trying to take over the world and you try to stop them." The 12-year-old from Florida is spending two weeks at a summer camp in a program that teaches programming ...

Estonian first graders to learn computer code

Sep 06, 2012

Tech-savvy Estonia has launched a project encouraging public schools to teach pupils, including first graders, to write computer code, the project's authors said Thursday.

Video: Gates, Zuckerberg urge kids to code (Update)

Feb 26, 2013

Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter creator Jack Dorsey are among the tech luminaries appearing in a new video promoting the teaching and learning of computer coding in schools.

Recommended for you

Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

3 hours ago

The U.S. freight railroad industry says only one-fifth of its track will be equipped with mandatory safety technology to prevent most collisions and derailments by the deadline set by Congress.

Gaza cops trade bullets for laser-tech in training

Apr 14, 2014

Security forces in the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip are using technology to practice shooting on laser simulators, saving money spent on ammunition in the cash-strapped Palestinian territory.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
not rated yet Aug 12, 2013
As I would pay money for it, what, in concrete terms, is this supposed to accomplish? Any independent assessments on how effective it is?
MarvinF77
not rated yet Aug 12, 2013
I understand a need to support your business, but it bothers me to see that "anyone can Tynker" yet admission is 50 dollars. People will always complain about prices, but some kids are prevented from crawling out of poverty as a result of the doors that are financially shut to them. Of the few families that I know that are living below poverty, none would prioritize 50 dollars for their child, but they would all allow their child to sit on a computer for 10 or more hours a day. This isn't the only company offering this type of 'education', but it is one that is supposedly aimed at all children. This was more like an advertisement than an informative article.

More news stories

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.