Tomb find confirms powerful women ruled Peru long ago

Aug 22, 2013 by Roberto Cortijo
Workers uncover a burial chamber of the Moche culture in the Cao religious compound, close to the city of Trujillo, Peru, on August 3, 2013. The discovery in Peru of another tomb belonging to a pre-Hispanic priestess, the eighth in more than two decades, confirms that powerful women ruled this region 1,200 years ago, archeologists said.

The discovery in Peru of another tomb belonging to a pre-Hispanic priestess, the eighth in more than two decades, confirms that powerful women ruled this region 1,200 years ago, archeologists said.

The remains of the woman from the Moche—or Mochica—civilization were discovered in late July in an area called La Libertad in the country's northern Chepan province.

It is one of several finds in this region that have amazed scientists. In 2006, researchers came across the famous "Lady of Cao"—who died about 1,700 years ago and is seen as one of the first female rulers in Peru.

"This find makes it clear that women didn't just run rituals in this area but governed here and were queens of Mochica society," project director Luis Jaime Castillo told AFP.

"It is the eighth priestess to be discovered," he added. "Our excavations have only turned up tombs with women, never men."

The priestess was in an "impressive 1,200-year-old burial chamber" the said, pointing out that the Mochica were known as master craftsmen.

"The burial chamber of the priestess is 'L'-shaped and made of clay, covered with copper plates in the form of waves and ," Castillo said.

Near the neck is a mask and a knife, he added.

View of one of two skeletons found in a burial chamber of the Moche culture (between 200-700 AD), in the Cao religious compound, close to the city of Trujillo, Peru, on August 3, 2013.

The tomb, decorated with pictures in red and yellow, also has ceramic offerings—mostly small vases—hidden in about 10 niches on the side.

"Accompanying the priestess are bodies of five children, two of them babies, and two adults, all of whom were sacrificed," Castillo said, noting there were two feathers atop the .

Julio Saldana, the archeologist responsible for work in the , said the discovery of the tomb confirms the village of San Jose de Moro is a cemetery of the Mochica elite, with the most impressive belonging to women.

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cronie
1 / 5 (2) Aug 23, 2013
Possible source for the Amazon legends?
Neinsense99
1 / 5 (5) Aug 24, 2013
No, those "powerful women" were not former Soviet-bloc shot-put competitors with a time machine. With all the pseudoscience postings on some topics it doesn't hurt to be clear...
jwilcos
not rated yet Aug 28, 2013
Powerful women rule the world today. They are just clever enough to let men think they are in charge.
sirchick
not rated yet Aug 28, 2013
If they dig up the Queen of England's grave in 1000 years, i guess they would make the same assumption regarding power. But she too has zero power - only influence.

This is what i hate about people who excavate sites, making huge assumptions from very little information.
Gmr
not rated yet Aug 28, 2013

This is what i hate about people who excavate sites, making huge assumptions from very little information.


Yeah!

Wait.

No! I prefer this kind to the kind that simply dig it all up for loot and don't care to even make assumptions. Given that Pharaohs of ancient Egypt were god-kings and even they only got effigies to follow them into the afterlife, and given that there are only female tombs blanketed in what would have to be a large amount of metal for the time ... I'm inclined to give them this one until contravening evidence comes to light.
sirchick
not rated yet Aug 30, 2013

This is what i hate about people who excavate sites, making huge assumptions from very little information.


Yeah!

Wait.

No! I prefer this kind to the kind that simply dig it all up for loot and don't care to even make assumptions. Given that Pharaohs of ancient Egypt were god-kings and even they only got effigies to follow them into the afterlife, and given that there are only female tombs blanketed in what would have to be a large amount of metal for the time ... I'm inclined to give them this one until contravening evidence comes to light.


Or they dig it up say what they found let people's imagination deicide given theres no way to know the truth... why do we have to explain it by guess work... it might as well just stay a mystery and remain interesting that way.