No reward for hacking Zuckerberg Facebook page

Aug 19, 2013
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during an event at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California on on April 4, 2013. A researcher who hacked into Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg's profile to expose a security flaw won't get the customary reward payment from the social network.

A researcher who hacked into Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg's profile to expose a security flaw won't get the customary reward payment from the social network.

While Facebook offers rewards for those who find security holes, it seems that Palestinian researcher Khalil Shreateh went too far by posting the information on Zuckerberg's own profile page.

Shreateh said on his blog he found a way for Facebook users to circumvent security and modify a user's timeline.

He said he took the unusual step of hacking into Zuckerberg's profile after being ignored by the Facebook security team.

"So i did post to Mark Zuckerberg's timeline , as those pictures shows," he said, including screen shots of the posting.

"Dear Mark Zuckerberg," he wrote."First sorry for breaking your privacy and post to your wall, i had no other choice to make after all the reports i sent to Facebook team. My name is KHALIL from Palestine."

His reward for exposing the flaw was having his Facebook account disabled.

He later got a message saying, "We are unfortunately not able to pay you for this because your actions violated our Terms of Service. We do hope, however, that you continue to work with us to find vulnerabilities in the site."

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

Facebook said it appreciates help with security but not by hacking into .

Facebook Matt Jones posted a comment Sunday on a security forum saying "we fixed this bug on Thursday," and admitted that "we should have asked for additional... instructions after his initial report."

"We get hundreds of reports every day," Jones said. "We have paid out over $1 million to hundreds of reporters. However, many of the reports we get are nonsense or misguided."

Jones added that "the more important issue here is with how the bug was demonstrated using the accounts of without their permission."

"We welcome and will pay out for future reports from him (and anyone else!) if they're found and demonstrated within these guidelines," Jones said on the YCombinator hacker news forum.

Independent security researcher Graham Cluley said he had "some sympathy" with Facebook on the issue.

"Although he was frustrated by the response from Facebook's security team, Shreateh did the wrong thing by using the flaw to post a message on Mark Zuckerberg's wall," Cluley said on his blog.

Explore further: Fitbit to Schumer: We don't sell personal data

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Facebook fixes photo privacy bug

Dec 07, 2011

Facebook has fixed a bug that allowed the viewing of some private photographs of other members and which was reportedly used to access personal pictures of founder Mark Zuckerberg.

Facebook tightens user security

Jan 26, 2011

Facebook on Wednesday announced heightened privacy controls for members of the world's largest online social network.

Facebook CEO meets SKorean president

Jun 18, 2013

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has met South Korean President Park Geun-hye in Seoul to discuss ways to stimulate entrepreneurship and venture firms in Asia's fourth-largest economy.

Recommended for you

Fitbit to Schumer: We don't sell personal data

8 hours ago

The maker of a popular line of wearable fitness-tracking devices says it has never sold personal data to advertisers, contrary to concerns raised by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer.

Should you be worried about paid editors on Wikipedia?

13 hours ago

Whether you trust it or ignore it, Wikipedia is one of the most popular websites in the world and accessed by millions of people every day. So would you trust it any more (or even less) if you knew people ...

How much do we really know about privacy on Facebook?

14 hours ago

The recent furore about the Facebook Messenger app has unearthed an interesting question: how far are we willing to allow our privacy to be pushed for our social connections? In the case of the Facebook ...

Philippines makes arrests in online extortion ring

14 hours ago

Philippine police have arrested eight suspected members of an online syndicate accused of blackmailing more than 1,000 Hong Kong and Singapore residents after luring them into exposing themselves in front of webcam, an official ...

Google to help boost Greece's tourism industry

Aug 21, 2014

Internet giant Google will offer management courses to 3,000 tourism businesses on the island of Crete as part of an initiative to promote the sector in Greece, industry union Sete said on Thursday.

Music site SoundCloud to start paying artists

Aug 21, 2014

SoundCloud said Thursday that it will start paying artists and record companies whose music is played on the popular streaming site, a move that will bring it in line with competitors such as YouTube and Spotify.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

machinephilosophy
not rated yet Aug 21, 2013
It's precisely the "within the guidelines" constraint that nullifies any pretension about wanting to really test the system. Idiots. Any time you have an ORGANIZED GROUP do anything, over time it devolves to the mediocrity, stupidity, and self-stultifying characteristics of a perennial cat-spat garden club. Status-quo organizationalism guarantees permanent bluntedness.

And if you want to a guarantee to keep out the innovative geniuses, just have a department called PERSONNEL.