Red delicious or wolf apple? Brazilian savanna fruits high in antioxidants

Aug 21, 2013

Native Brazilian fruits grown in arid climates and poor soil have similar antioxidant activity to conventionally grown Red Delicious apples, according to research published August 21 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Sandra Fernandes Arruda from the University of Brazil and colleagues from other institutions.

Twelve fruit species grown on the Cerrado, a savanna with , were compared to conventional Red Delicious apples purchased at local markets; the researchers found that several of these native species had higher proportions of bioactive compounds and pigments than the apples. The proportion of these compounds correlated with antioxidant properties of the fruit extracts when experimentally tested. Based on these results, the authors conclude that native fruits grown in sub-optimal conditions can confer similar nutritional benefits to apples, which are considered among the most antioxidant-rich foods.

The fruits studied here include indigenous species such as lobeira, also called 'wolf apple', tucum, a variety of palm, and other fruits which grow in the and poor soil of the Cerrado. Though commonly consumed fruits like apples or strawberries have been extensively studied for their chemical constituents, the nutritional benefits of fruits grown in such conditions are not well-known. The authors conclude, "Such fruits can provide a source of new with functional properties beneficial to health, which should stimulate the pharmaceutical and food industries for the development of new products, promoting the sustainable development of regions with the characteristics of the Cerrado."

Explore further: Research could lead to better-tasting tomatoes, other benefits

More information: Siqueira EMdA, Rosa FR, Fustinoni AM, de Sant'Ana LP, Arruda SF (2013) Brazilian Savanna Fruits Contain Higher Bioactive Compounds Content and Higher Antioxidant Activity Relative to the Conventional Red Delicious Apple. PLoS ONE 8(8): e72826. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0072826

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Can an apple a day really keep the doctor away?

Mar 26, 2013

Studies of the bioactive compounds found in apples aim to uncover compounds that have an ability to prevent or alter the risk of serious ailments such as diabetes and heart disease.

New fruit products incorporate old and new

Aug 20, 2013

As the most consumed snack food in the United States, it is no surprise that fresh fruit is also the fastest growing. In the August issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), ...

Recommended for you

Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

9 hours ago

(Phys.org) —The incident was captured by Dr Bruna Bezerra and colleagues in the Atlantic Forest in the Northeast of Brazil.  Dr Bezerra is a Research Associate at the University of Bristol and a Professor ...

Orchid named after UC Riverside researcher

Apr 17, 2014

One day about eight years ago, Katia Silvera, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Riverside, and her father were on a field trip in a mountainous area in central Panama when they stumbled ...

In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises

Apr 17, 2014

Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but re ...

Fear of the cuckoo mafia

Apr 17, 2014

If a restaurant owner fails to pay the protection money demanded of him, he can expect his premises to be trashed. Warnings like these are seldom required, however, as fear of the consequences is enough to ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Researchers successfully clone adult human stem cells

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, led by Robert Lanza, of Advanced Cell Technology, has announced that they have performed the first successful cloning of adult human skin cells into stem ...

Plants with dormant seeds give rise to more species

Seeds that sprout as soon as they're planted may be good news for a garden. But wild plants need to be more careful. In the wild, a plant whose seeds sprouted at the first warm spell or rainy day would risk disaster. More ...

Researchers develop new model of cellular movement

(Phys.org) —Cell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic development to repairing wounded tissue. It also enables cancer cells to break free from their sites of ...

Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

(Phys.org) —The incident was captured by Dr Bruna Bezerra and colleagues in the Atlantic Forest in the Northeast of Brazil.  Dr Bezerra is a Research Associate at the University of Bristol and a Professor ...