PLoS ONE is an open access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) since 2006. It covers primary research from any discipline within science and medicine. All submissions go through an internal and external pre-publication peer review but are not excluded on the basis of lack of perceived importance or adherence to a scientific field. The PLoS ONE online platform has post-publication user discussion and rating features. PLoS ONE was launched in December 2006 as a beta version. It launched with Commenting and Note making functionality, and added the ability to rate articles in July 2007. In September 2007 the ability to leave "trackbacks" on articles was added. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008 PLoS ONE came out of "beta". Also in September 2009, as part of its "Article-Level Metrics" program, PLoS ONE made the full online usage data for every published article (HTML page views, PDF, and XML downloads) publicly available.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2006--present
Website
http://www.plosone.org/
Impact factor
4.411 (2010)

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Researcher uses network science to understand how materials work

Network science is how mathematicians and software designers construct complicated social networks like Facebook. But a group of Florida State University researchers has found that these equations can tell engineers a lot ...

Neotropical cloud forests to lose what most defines them: clouds

In as few as 25 years, climate change could shrink and dry 60-80% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests, finds a study published today. If greenhouse gas emissions continue increasing as they have been, 90% of Western Hemisphere ...

Meet Gobihadros, a new species of Mongolian hadrosaur

The complete skeletal remains of a new species of Mongolian dinosaur fill in a gap in the evolution of hadrosaurs, according to a study released April 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Khishigjav Tsogtbataaar ...

The arrestin-GPCR connection

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the "inbox" of environmental messages in mammalian cells. Because of their central role in signaling pathways, mutations resulting in abnormal GPCR functions cause a wide variety of ...

How Twitter helped Trump win the U.S. Elections

New research published today, 9 April, 2019 found a movement of Twitter followers helped President Donald Trump garner support during his election campaign for the 2016 U.S. presidency.

Using artificial intelligence to understand collective behavior

Professor Thomas Müller and Professor Hans Briegel have been carrying out research on a machine learning model for several years that differs significantly from alternative artificial intelligence (AI) learning models. The ...

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