PLoS ONE is an open access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) since 2006. It covers primary research from any discipline within science and medicine. All submissions go through an internal and external pre-publication peer review but are not excluded on the basis of lack of perceived importance or adherence to a scientific field. The PLoS ONE online platform has post-publication user discussion and rating features. PLoS ONE was launched in December 2006 as a beta version. It launched with Commenting and Note making functionality, and added the ability to rate articles in July 2007. In September 2007 the ability to leave "trackbacks" on articles was added. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008 PLoS ONE came out of "beta". Also in September 2009, as part of its "Article-Level Metrics" program, PLoS ONE made the full online usage data for every published article (HTML page views, PDF, and XML downloads) publicly available.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2006--present
Website
http://www.plosone.org/
Impact factor
4.411 (2010)

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Nanoscopic protein motion on a live cell membrane

Cellular functions are dictated by the intricate motion of proteins in membranes that span across a scale of nanometers to micrometers, within a time-frame of microseconds to minutes. However, this rich parameter of space ...

Beach-combing Neanderthals dove for shells

Did Neanderthals wear swimsuits? Probably not. But a new study suggests that some of these ancient humans might have spent a lot of time at the beach. They may even have dived into the cool waters of the Mediterranean Sea ...

Researchers determine dinosaur replaced teeth as fast as sharks

A meat-eating dinosaur species (Majungasaurus) that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, as reported in a new study published today in the open-access journal ...

Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes

Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.

Pachacamac Idol of ancient Peru was symbolically painted

The Pachacamac Idol of ancient Peru was a multicolored and emblematic sacred icon worshipped for almost 700 hundred years before Spanish conquest, according to a study published January 15, 2020 in the open-access journal ...

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