PLoS ONE is an open access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) since 2006. It covers primary research from any discipline within science and medicine. All submissions go through an internal and external pre-publication peer review but are not excluded on the basis of lack of perceived importance or adherence to a scientific field. The PLoS ONE online platform has post-publication user discussion and rating features. PLoS ONE was launched in December 2006 as a beta version. It launched with Commenting and Note making functionality, and added the ability to rate articles in July 2007. In September 2007 the ability to leave "trackbacks" on articles was added. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008 PLoS ONE came out of "beta". Also in September 2009, as part of its "Article-Level Metrics" program, PLoS ONE made the full online usage data for every published article (HTML page views, PDF, and XML downloads) publicly available.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2006--present
Website
http://www.plosone.org/
Impact factor
4.411 (2010)

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Stranded whales detected from space

A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space. Researchers tested a new detection method using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images from Maxar Technologies ...

How US road safety plans may reduce road trauma

Curtin University researchers have applied a new comprehensive framework to assess road safety management plans in the United States of America, which may help to reduce the number of road incidents across the country.

New study shows coral reef fish do not mind 3-D-printed corals

Natural disasters such as hurricanes often leave devastation in their wake. Residents living in affected areas are sometimes displaced or require temporary shelter while their homes—or even neighborhoods—are repaired ...

Study identifies religious bias against refugees

Give me your Christian, your female, your English-speaking with a good education? While not the words on the Statue of Liberty, these seem to be the kinds of refugees that the American public prefers—according to a new ...

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