Former YSL CEO Paul Deneve joins Apple

Jul 03, 2013

Former Yves Saint Laurent CEO Paul Deneve has joined Apple to work on special projects, the US tech giant said Wednesday, amid speculation he could be involved in developing a rumoured smartwatch.

The 52-year-old Belgian, who worked at Apple in the 1990s, has since worked for several luxury and fashion houses including Courreges, Nina Ricci, Lanvin and YSL.

"We're thrilled to welcome Paul Deneve to Apple. He'll be working on special projects as a vice president reporting directly to Tim Cook," the Apple CEO, the company said in a statement.

Apple is reportedly working on wearable including a rumoured "iWatch".

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