Ivory Coast turns to brute force to save forests

Jul 12, 2013 by Christophe Koffi
A woman looks at the ruins of Baleko-Niegre village that was completely razed during a military operation to save the protected Niegre forest, on June 22, 2013. The Ivorian government sent troops and buldozers to reclaim the forest in southwestern Ivory Coast, leaving thousands of farmers, who had been illegally exploiting the land for years, without work and without homes.

It was a brutal end to a long-term problem. Faced with the dilemma of trying to save a protected forest, which had become home to thousands of people, the Ivory Coast government turned to force.

Soldiers, some armed with rocket launchers, and bulldozers were sent in to reclaim the southwestern of Niegre.

In a swift operation last month, the army completely razed the small town of Baleko-Niegre, tucked away in the tropical forest of the Sassandra region, about 360 kilometres (225 miles) west of the commercial capital Abidjan.

Little was spared: brick houses and clay huts were flattened, and the local school, church and marketplace were demolished. Camps deeper into the forest were also destroyed.

The government says the operation was to preserve Ivory Coast's woodland from illegal exploitation by people, often , who squat the land.

"The government has decided to take back control of its protected forests, which slipped away from it for 10 years," Minister of Water and Forestry Mathieu Babaud Darret said.

The June evacuation is believed to have left at least 20,000 people who had been living on the land for years bereft of homes and employment.

"We had occupied the protected forest in search of food," local farmer Raymond N'Dri Kouadio told AFP.

Those who had moved to the forest had done so to grow , of which Ivory Coast is the world's leading producer.

Leon Koffi N'Goran, a man in his 80s who lived in the Niegre forest for 28 years, acknowledged that the villagers were engaged in "clandestine" activity.

But the evacuation was "brutal and surprising", he said.

Many of those who were forced to flee complain of more sinister abuses.

A placard reading 'Preserve Niegre forest's fauna and flora,' seen on June 23, 2013. The Ivorian government sent troops and buldozers to reclaim the forest in southwestern Ivory Coast, leaving thousands of farmers, who had been illegally exploiting the land for years, without work and without homes after they razed Baleko-Niegre village.

The soldiers "even raped girls and they took away from me two motorbikes, 800,000 CFA francs (1,200 euros, $1,600 dollars)", one resident said.

The claims of rape have been denied by authorities in the west African state.

The government says it acted as part of a policy to regain control of protected woodland, exploited illegally during a decade of rebellion and warfare culminating in post-electoral violence in 2010-11 that claimed 3,000 lives.

During the years of troubles, many people began living in the forests, ignoring the government ban covering tracts of land rich in plant and animal life.

Sometimes, local warlords would "privatise" entire zones to exploit their resources.

Darret is convinced that it is time to act to prevent "the abusive and illegal exploitation" of some three million hectares (7.4 billion acres) of remaining forest in Ivory Coast.

Forest cover has dropped drastically since the 1960s, when it stood at 16 million hectares. Deforestation is blamed largely on the timber trade and the growth of the cocoa sector.

The desire of the Ivorian government to protect its forests appears to have support in Europe.

"The illegal exploitation of forests is a priority issue for Ivory Coast," said Thierry de Saint Maurice, the head of the European Union delegation in the country.

He added that management poses considerable challenges in matters of "governance" and pleaded for "more regulations and more respect for rules".

Farmers leave Baleko-Niegre village after it was razed during a military operation to save the protected Niegre forest, on June 22, 2013. The Ivorian government sent troops and buldozers to reclaim the forest in southwestern Ivory Coast, leaving thousands of farmers, who had been illegally exploiting the land for years, without work and without homes.

Conservation experts say the exploitation of forestry has been aided by corruption at government level.

"Corruption spreads like gangrene among officials from the water and forestry" ministry said Paul N'Goran, who works for the NGO Action for the Conservation of Biodiversity in Ivory Coast.

N'Goran claims that many departmental workers "have sold, without being troubled, hundreds of hectares, even whole domains of the forest" to politicians and bosses in the timber industry.

Authorities have said they may provide for the people of Niegre who lost their homes, though it is unclear how.

Many of the villagers have since sought refuge in other settlements, often with relatives.

Now people occupying other protected forests also fear for their future.

At Moussadougou, another big village built in the forest of Monogaga, west of Sassandra, residents dread that the bulldozers will come for them next.

"If we are chased out, there's only one thing left for me: to await my death," said 70-year-old Moussa Diaby.

Explore further: Germany restricts fracking but doesn't ban it

Related Stories

Indonesia extends logging ban to protect rainforest

May 15, 2013

Indonesia has extended a logging ban to protect rainforests despite fierce industry pressure, the government said Wednesday, but green groups slammed it as inadequate to safeguard threatened habitats.

Gabon says half its elephants killed since 2004

Feb 06, 2013

More than half of Gabon's elephant population has been killed by poachers since 2004 despite ramped up security measures to try to stop the slaughter, wildlife officials said Wednesday.

Wolf Lake ancient forest is endangered ecosystem

Jun 26, 2013

(Phys.org) —New research from the University of Guelph, published Tuesday in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation, says that allowing industrial extraction in a northern Ontario old-growth red pine forest – the la ...

Philippines to destroy five tonnes of ivory tusks

Jun 11, 2013

The Philippines said Tuesday it would destroy five tonnes of confiscated elephant tusks as part of a global campaign to raise awareness against the illegal trade of so-called "blood ivories".

Recommended for you

Germany restricts fracking but doesn't ban it

1 hour ago

The German cabinet drew up rules Wednesday on the hitherto unregulated technology of "fracking" in Germany, narrowly restricting its use, but stopping short of an outright ban.

Life in the poisonous breath of sleeping volcanos

2 hours ago

Researchers of the University Jena analyze the microbial community in volcanically active soils. In a mofette close to the Czech river Plesná in north-western Bohemia, the team around Prof. Dr. Kirsten Küsel ...

Eggs and chicken instead of beef reap major climate gains

3 hours ago

Beef on our plates is one of the biggest climate villains, but that does not mean we have to adopt a vegan diet to reach climate goals. Research results from Chalmers University of Technology show that adopting ...

Local action needed to protect nature from global warming

5 hours ago

Stronger local management can increase the resilience of nature to the impacts of climate change, writes an international team of researchers in Science. The authors examined three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: ...

Deforestation is messing with our weather and our food

6 hours ago

Today, the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) at the University of Maryland published new research in Nature Communications providing insight into how large-scale deforestation could ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.