EU says Google not doing enough in antitrust case

Jul 17, 2013

(AP)—The European Union's competition chief says Google isn't doing enough to overcome concerns that it's stifling competition, and ordered the Internet giant to come up with new ideas.

The European Commission, the EU's executive arm, has been investigating for three years whether Google Inc. is abusing its 90 percent market share in Internet searches in Europe to favor its own services. Google has sought to address the concerns mainly by changing how it displays search results.

EU Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said Wednesday that after hearing from other companies and organizations, "I concluded that proposals that Google sent to us months ago are not enough to overcome our concerns."

He said he sent a letter to Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt "asking Google to present better proposals."

In response, Google spokesman Al Verney said says its proposal "clearly addresses" the four areas of concern laid out by EU authorities. "We continue to work with the commission to settle this case," he said.

In addition to Google's dominance of Internet searches in Europe, the Commission has also expressed concern about how Google manages the ads appearing next to its search results, how Google displays content from other websites and how its actions affect advertising on rival networks.

Both sides say they are committed to reaching a settlement. Without one, the Commission could formally file a case against Google, leading to a lengthy process that could result in fines worth 10 percent of Google's annual revenue.

The European Commission has often taken a harder line with U.S. tech companies than its American counterparts, the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department. Google settled a similar antitrust complaint on its with the FTC in January without making any major concessions on how it runs its search engine.

Explore further: Twitter admits to diversity problem in workforce

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

EU to ask Google to boost anti-trust offer

May 28, 2013

The European Commission said on Tuesday that it will probably ask US Internet giant Google to improve the way it intends to satisfy EU concerns over its dominant position in the online search and advertising ...

Google, EU 'near deal' on search probe

Apr 13, 2013

US Internet giant Google is preparing changes to its dominant search system to satisfy EU anti-trust authorities, the Financial Times said on Saturday.

Recommended for you

Study shows role of media in sharing life events

8 hours ago

To share is human. And the means to share personal news—good and bad—have exploded over the last decade, particularly social media and texting. But until now, all research about what is known as "social sharing," or the ...

UK: Former reporter sentenced for phone hacking

15 hours ago

(AP)—A former British tabloid reporter was given a 10-month suspended prison sentence Thursday for his role in the long-running phone hacking scandal that shook Rupert Murdoch's media empire.

Evaluating system security by analyzing spam volume

15 hours ago

The Center for Research on Electronic Commerce (CREC) at The University of Texas at Austin is working to protect consumer data by using a company's spam volume to evaluate its security vulnerability through the SpamRankings.net ...

Surveillance a part of everyday life

16 hours ago

Details of casual conversations and a comprehensive store of 'deleted' information were just some of what Victoria University of Wellington students found during a project to uncover what records companies ...

European Central Bank hit by data theft

17 hours ago

(AP)—The European Central Bank said Thursday that email addresses and other contact information have been stolen from a database that serves its public website, though it stressed that no internal systems or market-sensitive ...

Twitter admits to diversity problem in workforce

19 hours ago

(AP)—Twitter acknowledged Wednesday that it has been hiring too many white and Asian men to fill high-paying technology jobs, just like several other major companies in Silicon Valley.

User comments : 0