Texas banker puts up $1M for tricky math solution

Jun 04, 2013

A Texas banker is upping the ante to $1 million for whoever solves a tricky problem that's been dogging mathematicians since the 1980s.

The Providence, R.I.-based American Mathematical Society on Tuesday said $1 million will be awarded for the publication of a solution to the Beal Conjecture problem.

Dallas banker D. Andrew Beal first offered the Beal Prize in 1997 for $5,000. Over the years, the amount has grown.

spokesman Michael Breen says a solution is more difficult than the one for a related problem, Fermat's Last Theorem, which didn't have a published solution for hundreds of years.

Beal is a self-taught and says he wants to inspire young people to pursue math and science.

Explore further: Professor quantifies how 'one thing leads to another'

More information: Beal Prize: bit.ly/14eTRCC

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Stephen_Crowley
1 / 5 (4) Jun 10, 2013
A proof of Beal's conjecture is claimed at http://scienceasi.../view/32 looks interesting!
Porgie
1 / 5 (4) Jun 17, 2013
Good for him. God Bless him. We need people who are really interested in math and science rather than just rhetoric.