Scientists moving 15-ton magnet from NY to Chicago

Jun 16, 2013 by Frank Eltman
A model of the truck that will be used to transport the Muon g-2 ring, placed on a streetscape for scale. The truck will be escorted by police and other vehicles when it moves from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York to a barge, and then from the barge to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. Credit: Fermilab

A 50-foot-wide electromagnet built in suburban New York is headed on a five-week journey to Chicago.

The electromagnet weighs at least 15 tons and was the largest in the world when it was built by scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s.

Brookhaven scientists no longer have a need for the electromagnet, so it is being moved to the Fermi laboratory, where it will be used in a new experiment called Muon g-2. (MEW'-on jee-minus-two).

The results could create in the realm of .

The magnet will be taken by barge down the Atlantic, around Florida, then up the Mississippi River to Illinois.

The move is expected to cost about $3 million. But constructing an entirely new could cost as much as $30 million.

Explore further: Neutrino trident production may offer powerful probe of new physics

4.7 /5 (6 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

LHC experiments eliminate more Higgs hiding spots (Update)

Aug 22, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Two experimental collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider, located at CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, announced today that they have significantly narrowed the mass region in which the Higgs ...

Handheld nanoLAB detects disease proteins in minutes

Feb 23, 2011

In 2009, Stanford University faculty member Shan Wang and doctoral students Richard Gaster and Drew Hall demonstrated that they could use the same ultrasensitive magnetic sensors that form the basis of today's compact, high-capacity ...

Recommended for you

And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever

6 hours ago

A team of researchers at Boston University and Stanford University School of Medicine has developed a new model to study the motion patterns of bacteria in real time and to determine how these motions relate ...

Tandem microwave destroys hazmat, disinfects

10 hours ago

Dangerous materials can be destroyed, bacteria spores can be disinfected, and information can be collected that reveals the country of origin of radiological isotopes - all of this due to a commercial microwave ...

Cornell theorists continue the search for supersymmetry

12 hours ago

(Phys.org) —It was a breakthrough with profound implications for the world as we know it: the Higgs boson, the elementary particle that gives all other particles their mass, discovered at the Large Hadron ...

How did evolution optimize circadian clocks?

Sep 12, 2014

(Phys.org) —From cyanobacteria to humans, many terrestrial species have acquired circadian rhythms that adapt to sunlight in order to increase survival rates. Studies have shown that the circadian clocks ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Noumenon
1.2 / 5 (23) Jun 16, 2013
It'll be riddled with bullet holes.
ValeriaT
not rated yet Jun 21, 2013
The main problem is the avoiding of all deforms and impacts, because the annealed neodymium-tin alloy is extremely brittle (which is the consequence of its superconductivity at low temperature). The electrons inside of f-orbitals cages are squeezing the electrons inside of d-orbital, which induces their compression and condensation into superconductive state - but it results into the internal stress and brittleness of atom lattice too.