US Army reviews rules of engagement over cyber threat

Jun 27, 2013
Gen. Martin Dempsey testifies on June 12, 2013 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The US military is reviewing its rules of engagement to deal with the growing threat of cyber crime, Dempsey said Thursday.

The US military is reviewing its rules of engagement to deal with the growing threat of cyber crime, military chief Martin Dempsey said Thursday.

Dempsey, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the highest-ranking officer in the US military, said the review was in response to soaring .

"The Department of Defense has developed emergency procedures to guide our response to imminent, significant ," Dempsey said in a speech at the Brookings Institution, a Washington-based think tank.

"We are updating our rules of engagement - the first update for cyber in seven years - and improving command and control for cyber forces."

Dempsey said that since his appointment as head of the Joint Chiefs in 2011 "intrusions into our critical infrastructure have increased 17-fold."

Some 4,000 cyber-security experts would join the ranks over the next four years, while some $23 billion would be spent on tackling the threat.

Dempsey said Cybercom—the US command responsible for combatting cyber-crime—was now organized in three divisions.

One team was in charge of countering enemy attacks, another was tasked with offering regional support while a third was responsible for protecting some 15,000 US networks.

In addition following a presidential directive, the now had a manual which allowed it to cooperate with the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI in the event of attacks on civilian networks.

Dempsey meanwhile lamented what he described as inadequate safeguards by the private sector.

"Our nation's effort to protect civilian critical infrastructure is lagging," he said. "Too few companies have invested adequately in cyber security."

In a reference to concerns over the levels of government surveillance on private individuals since the revelations by leaker Edward Snowden, Dempsey said he believed a balance could be struck.

"I understand that the country is debating the proper purpose, and limits, of intelligence collection for national security," he said.

"Let me be clear—these are two different things. One is collecting intelligence to locate foreign terrorists and their domestic co-conspirators; the other is sharing information about malware to protect our critical infrastructure from a different kind of attack."

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User comments : 5

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antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (2) Jun 27, 2013
our response to imminent, significant cyber threats


Whenever I read #imminent' in such statements I can't help but conclude that they have just signed carte blanche on preemptive cyber attacks and wholesale spying on their own people.

Oh america, what have you become. You used to be the land of the free. Now you're the land of the watchers and the being watched ones.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 27, 2013
"Gen. Martin Dempsey"

Huh. I see a distinct resemblence...
http://nashvilleb...ever.jpg
Whenever I read #imminent' in such statements I can't help but conclude that they have just signed carte blahblah
And whenever I see a comment by aa on military issues I expect to read some variation on the virtues of letting the enemy attack on ITS own terms and when IT is best prepared.
preemptive cyber attacks and wholesale spying on their own people
-And I see I am again undisappointed.

Dont you see how EVIL it is aa, to ignore the enemy until they are breaking down your door?

It is dec 6 1941. In the US isolationists are congratulating themselves on their success at keeping their country out of world conflicts.

It is now dec 7 1941 and there are a LOT fewer isolationists in the US. What happened to them aa? Was it the rapture perhaps?

No, they just changed their minds. Such was the state of the nation on sept 11 2001.
Wolf358
not rated yet Jun 27, 2013
There are no "rules of engagement" in cyber war. It's no-holds-barred anything goes down and dirty, like regular war becomes when you really want to win it. It's critical to remember that WAR is an acronym for "Waste All Resources". Anyone who expects that the enemy will follow some kind of rulebook is a loser who just doesn't know it yet...
Humpty
1 / 5 (4) Jun 28, 2013
General Suxdix:

"We are updating our rules of engagement - the first update for cyber in seven years - and improving command and control for cyber forces."

Bullshit at best - Evil business as usual, with different black marks on white bits of paper.

Watching how arseholes like this guy and the rest of team stupid, treat Madding, Assange and Edward Snowdon - and how the Corporation Nation USA thinks the rest of the world are it's slaves to exploit as it sees fit - along with all the CIA led coups and destruction of other governments, for more compliant NAZI regimes - so the American banks and military can rake in huge profits, then all I can say to "General Suxdix" is fuck you.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Jun 28, 2013
Watching how arseholes like this guy and the rest of team stupid, treat Madding, Assange and Edward Snowdon - and how the Corporation Nation USA thinks the rest of the world are it's slaves to exploit as it sees fit - along with all the CIA led coups and destruction of other governments, for more compliant NAZI regimes - so the American banks and military can rake in huge profits, then all I can say to "General Suxdix" is fuck you.

Well arent you a verbose little puissant. Heres someone with an actual intellect who can best describe your attitude
http://www.youtub...vgwBiKl0

Heres you
http://www.youtub...aDKZ-SuE