Snake's ultra-black spots may aid high-tech quest

May 16, 2013
A gaboon viper is seen in captivity on January 17, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Scientists have identified nanostructures in the ultra-black skin markings of an African viper which they said Thursday could inspire the quest to create the ultimate light-absorbing material.

Scientists have identified nanostructures in the ultra-black skin markings of an African viper which they said Thursday could inspire the quest to create the ultimate light-absorbing material.

The West African Gaboon viper, one of the largest in Africa and a master of camouflage, has dark spots in the of its skin that are deep, velvety black and reflect very little light.

Interwoven with white- and brown-coloured scales that are very reflective, this creates a high contrast that renders the snake difficult to spot on the richly-patterned rainforest floor.

A team of set out to find the secret behind the black spots' ultra darkness, and found that the scale surface was made up of tightly-packed, leaf-like covered in turn with nanometre-sized ridges.

Writing in the Scientific Reports, the team theorised that the micro- and nanostructures, which protrude at slightly different angles, scatter and trap incoming light.

"The structure based velvet black effect could also be potentially transferred to other materials," the scientists wrote.

The search for a high-absorbing, low-reflecting artificial material is highly prized in science for its potential use in specialised optical systems or capture, for example.

Some artificial ultra-black surfaces are already darker than the snake's spots, study co-author Marlene Spinner of the University of Bonn's Institute of Zoology told AFP.

But introducing the snake's nanotechnology could potentially enhance their light absorbancy even more.

"The micro-ornamentation on the snake's velvet black scales is a further example that the same physical law applies to both nature and technology and leads consequently to similar constructions," wrote the team.

Explore further: Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers

More information: Paper: dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep01846

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A cosmic snake for Chinese New Year

Feb 11, 2013

Gong Hey Fat Choy! Today marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year and what better way to celebrate the Year of the Black Snake than with a look at an enormous shadowy cosmic serpent, the Snake Nebula! ...

New scarlet snake found in Cambodia

Jul 16, 2012

A new species of snake which is scarlet with black and white rings has been discovered in Cambodia's rainforest, conservationists announced on Monday.

4C+29.30: Black hole powered jets plow into galaxy

May 15, 2013

(Phys.org) —This composite image of a galaxy illustrates how the intense gravity of a supermassive black hole can be tapped to generate immense power. The image contains X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray ...

New snake species announced

Jan 09, 2012

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced the discovery of a spectacularly colored snake from a remote area of Tanzania in East Africa.

Recommended for you

Twisted graphene chills out

Sep 17, 2014

(Phys.org) —When two sheets of graphene are stacked in a special way, it is possible to cool down the graphene with a laser instead of heating it up, University of Manchester researchers have shown.

User comments : 0