Poachers kill rare rhinos in India's northeast

Mar 24, 2013
Tourists riding on elephants look at a rhinoceros at Pobitora wildlife sanctuary, east of Guwahati last November. A gang of poachers killed a rare one-horned rhino at a wildlife park in northeast India, taking to 15 the number of such beasts slaughtered this year, an official says.

A gang of poachers killed a rare one-horned rhino at a wildlife park in northeast India, taking to 15 the number of such beasts slaughtered this year, an official said on Sunday.

Heavily-armed fired at the rhino late Saturday inside Assam state's Kaziranga National Park and its horn was gouged out, just a day after another giant pachyderm was killed, a wildlife official said.

"Two rhinos have been killed in two days and it is a matter of concern for all of us," a park ranger told AFP by telephone, requesting not to be named since the state government has gagged officials from speaking to the media.

"Poachers used AK-47 and 303 rifles to shoot dead the rhino. We have recovered empty cartridges from the site of the incident," the official said.

An Indian forest official in Nagon on yesterday walks past the body of a rhino killed by poachers. "Two rhinos have been killed in two days and it is a matter of concern for all of us," a park ranger told AFP by telephone, requesting not to be named since the state government has gagged officials from speaking to the media.

Kaziranga has fought a sustained battle against rhino poachers who kill the animals for their horns, which fetch huge prices in some Asian countries.

The main market for the horn is China where it is used for making medicine and jewellery while in Vietnam many believe the horn has cancer curing and aphrodisiac qualities.

At least 21 rhinos were killed last year by poachers in Kaziranga, about 200 kilometres (120 miles) from Assam's main city Guwahati.

A 2012 census in the park put the number of the at 2,290 out of a global one-horned rhinoceros population of 3,300.

The species fell to near extinction in the early 1990s and is currently listed as "vulnerable" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, one notch away from "endangered".

The opposition parties have hit out against the state government for failing to combat rampant poaching.

"Poaching has been going on and the government is unable to check it. We see a definite nexus between forest officials and poachers," Sarbananda Sonowal, a local leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party, told AFP.

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User comments : 6

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TheGhostofOtto1923
2 / 5 (4) Mar 24, 2013
The only way to monitor these animals and catch poachers is robotically.
http://www.youtub...JMk2fgJU
Shootist
4 / 5 (4) Mar 24, 2013
The only way to monitor these animals and catch poachers is robotically.
http://www.youtub...JMk2fgJU


Better to sample the genome of every animal you can find and store it for future use.

Also, Governments could set aside large, inaccessible, nature preserves and shoot on sight, any human found there.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.3 / 5 (7) Mar 24, 2013
I wouldn't say that's better. I would say that horns could be infused with substances that render them deadly, or at least make the assholes who ingest them impotent. Call them denatured horns. Render them worthless.
Shootist
4.2 / 5 (5) Mar 24, 2013
Dead humans would put paid to the notion that collecting rhino horns is a good idea that pays well. But seeding the market with poisonous fake horn that causes the victim's testicles to slowly rot away, while emitting a foul odor, might not be a bad idea.
jsdarkdestruction
3 / 5 (2) Mar 25, 2013
I think its time to declare open season on poachers and put out a bounty on their heads worth a similar amount to a rhino horn. we'll see how they like it.
chris_African-wildlife-detective
not rated yet Mar 28, 2013
Shoot to kill is sometimes encouraged but the highly organised nature of poaching syndicates means that the poacher on the ground is doing all the dirty work, while much higher up the chain is a very organised syndicate.

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