The photo tag is back on Facebook

Feb 27, 2013 by Scott Kleinberg And Amy Guth

Tagging photos is hardly new on Facebook. In 2012, Facebook temporarily suspended the feature to make what it called technical improvements. This may or may not have had something to do with the outcry from privacy advocates and lawmakers both in the U.S. and Europe.

re-enabled this feature on Jan. 31, reminding us that "this is the same feature that millions of people previously used to help them quickly share billions of photos with friends and family."

As far as features go, it works pretty well. Sometimes it's a little bit creepy how good Facebook is at recognizing our . If you're a fan of complete in all of your photo albums, you'll appreciate having the back. But if you worry about privacy, there's something you should know: The feature is enabled by default. The only are "friends and "no one," but you should at least be aware of this very important setting.

Even enabled, no one is tagged automatically. Facebook is very clear in explaining that when a photo that looks like you is uploaded, a tag is suggested. The idea is to save time, not to violate anyone's privacy.

But you can opt out, and in my opinion you should. Here's how:

- Click on the gear icon at the top of your Facebook profile.

- Choose Account Settings.

- On the left side of the page, choose Timeline and Tagging.

- You should see three sections. Under the third one, titled "How can I manage tags people add and tagging suggestions?", the last selection is called, "Who sees tag suggestions when photos that look like you are uploaded?" You can change that option from friends to no one. (Note that if you did this when the feature was previously enabled, your choice may still be there. But it's worth checking.)

If being tagged in a photo doesn't concern you, it is acceptable to leave it on the default setting - especially since Facebook will always notify you first. But those notifications can add up, and you don't want to approve something you'll regret.

Facebook's privacy settings have improved drastically over the past several years, but I still wish it was easier to find them. This type of change is a good reminder that you should be aware of the choices and selections in the privacy and account settings. Case in point, this particular change strikes me more as privacy, but the menu isn't under privacy settings. I recommend revisiting the settings under account and privacy once a month.

Explore further: Turkey still hopes Twitter will open local office

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Facebook to suggest friends to tag in users photos

Dec 16, 2010

(AP) -- Facebook will try to make it easier to identify friends in photos uploaded to the social networking site by using facial recognition software to suggest people that users may want to tag.

Recommended for you

Net neutrality balancing act

15 hours ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

Apr 16, 2014

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

Apr 16, 2014

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...