Unrestricted access to the details of deadly eruptions

Jan 18, 2013
Unrestricted access to the details of deadly eruptions
Eruption column from the explosive phase of the Eyjafjallajokull eruption drifting over a farm 10km to the south of the volcano, Iceland, 8 May 2010. Credit: Dr Susanna Jenkins

Details of around 2,000 major volcanic eruptions which occurred over the last 1.8 million years have been made available in a new open access database, complied by scientists at the University of Bristol with colleagues from the UK, US, Colombia and Japan.

Volcanic eruptions have the potential to cause loss of life, disrupt air traffic, impact climate, and significantly alter the surrounding landscape. Knowledge of the past behaviours of volcanoes is key to producing risk assessments of the hazards of modern explosive events.

The open access database of Large Magnitude Explosive Eruptions (LaMEVE) will provide this crucial information to researchers, civil authorities and the general public alike.

Compiled by an international team headed by Dr Sian Crosweller from the Bristol's School of Earth Sciences with support from the British Geological Survey, the LaMEVE database provides – for the first time – rapid, searchable access to the breadth of information available for large volcanic events of magnitude 4 or greater with a quality score.

Dr Crosweller said: "Magnitude 4 or greater eruptions – such as in 79AD, Krakatoa in 1883 and in 1980 – are typically responsible for the most loss of life in the historical period. The database's restriction to eruptions of this size puts the emphasis on events whose low frequency and large hazard footprint mean preparation and response are often poor."

Currently, data fields include: magnitude, Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI), deposit volumes, eruption dates, and rock type; such parameters constituting the mainstay for description of eruptive activity.

Planned expansion of LaMEVE will include the principal volcanic hazards (such as pyroclastic flows, tephra fall, lahars, debris avalanches, ballistics), and vulnerability (for example, population figures, building type) – details of value to those involved in research and decisions relating to risk.

LaMEVE is the first component of the Volcanic Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA) database for volcanic hazards developed as part of the Global Volcano Model (GVM).

Principal Investigator and co-author, Professor Stephen Sparks of Bristol's School of said: "The long-term goal of this project is to have a global source of freely available information on volcanic hazards that can be used to develop protocols in the event of volcanic eruptions.

"Importantly, the scientific community are invited to actively participate with the database by sending new data and modifications to the manager and, after being given clearance as a GVM user, entering data thereby maintaining the resource's dynamism and relevance."

LaMEVE is freely available online.

Explore further: Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

More information: Crosweller, H. et al. Global database on large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions (LaMEVE), Journal of Applied Volcanology. www.appliedvolc.com/content/1/1/4

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Traveling through the volcanic conduit

Jul 23, 2012

How much ash will be injected into the atmosphere during Earth's next volcanic eruption? Recent eruptions have demonstrated our continued vulnerability to ash dispersal, which can disrupt the aviation industry ...

Recommended for you

Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

Apr 18, 2014

A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets. Some walls cracked and fell, but there were no reports of major damage or casualties.

User comments : 0

More news stories

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

UN weather agency warns of 'El Nino' this year

The UN weather agency Tuesday warned there was a good chance of an "El Nino" climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean this year, bringing droughts and heavy rainfall to the rest of the world.

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...