Japan scientists breed salmon from surrogates

Jan 15, 2013
Photo illustration obtained January 13, 2011 shows a Fraser River sockeye salmon in the North Pacific Ocean. Japanese scientists have successfully bred a type of salmon using surrogate parents of a different species.

Japanese scientists have successfully bred a type of salmon using surrogate parents of a different species, in a breakthrough that could help preserve endangered creatures, the chief researcher said Tuesday.

Researchers froze the testes of the yamame salmon, a fish indigenous to Japan that lives its entire life in rivers, before extracting primordial germ cells and implanting them into otherwise sterile hatchlings.

These primordial cells, called spermatogonia, were used by the fish's growing body to develop fully functional sperm in males and viable eggs in females, said Goro Yoshizaki at Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology.

The eggs and sperm can be fused in vitro to produce a healthy yamame salmon, he told AFP.

"As far as these kinds of trout and salmon are concerned, I can say this methodology is complete, and we can recreate sperm and eggs, and individuals, of the original species any time," Yoshizaki told AFP.

"We have confirmed the technology can also apply to tiger pufferfish as well," he said, referring to the popular—but poisonous—Japanese delicacy.

Yoshizaki and his team are already working on a project aimed at preserving species and would like to see if the same process is also possible in amphibians.

"I want to upgrade one class to another so that this technology can be applied eventually to reptiles and mammals," he said.

"But the hurdle is still high because the sets of genes are much more different between male and female mammals."

The study was published online in the of the United States of America.

Explore further: Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Making sperm from stem cells in a dish

Aug 04, 2011

Researchers have found a way to turn mouse embryonic stem cells into sperm. This finding, reported in the journal Cell in a special online release on August 4th, opens up new avenues for infertility research and treatment. A Kyo ...

Virus discovered in Cultus Lake sport fish

Jul 19, 2012

A Simon Fraser University fish-population statistician, working in collaboration with non-government organization scientists, has uncovered evidence of a potentially deadly virus in a freshwater sport fish ...

Japanese sperm cell breakthrough offers hope to infertile men

Mar 24, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- In what can only be described as cosmic forces at work, Japanese scientists working at Yokohama University, just south of Tokyo, have in the midst of a national crises, announced a major breakthrough in fertility ...

Recommended for you

Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

Apr 18, 2014

(Phys.org) —The incident was captured by Dr Bruna Bezerra and colleagues in the Atlantic Forest in the Northeast of Brazil.  Dr Bezerra is a Research Associate at the University of Bristol and a Professor ...

Orchid named after UC Riverside researcher

Apr 17, 2014

One day about eight years ago, Katia Silvera, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Riverside, and her father were on a field trip in a mountainous area in central Panama when they stumbled ...

In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises

Apr 17, 2014

Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but re ...

Fear of the cuckoo mafia

Apr 17, 2014

If a restaurant owner fails to pay the protection money demanded of him, he can expect his premises to be trashed. Warnings like these are seldom required, however, as fear of the consequences is enough to ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Tenche
1 / 5 (1) Jan 15, 2013
FrankenFish.
obama_socks
1 / 5 (2) Jan 15, 2013
Big profits to be made? The process could help to save the species if they ever become endangered. But there is no indication that they are.

More news stories

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.