US readers turn increasingly to digital books, study finds

Dec 27, 2012
Jeff Bezos CEO of Amazon introduces new Kindle Paper white electronic book during a press conference on September 06, 2012 in Santa Monica, California. US readers are increasingly opting for digital books instead of ink-and-paper editions, according to a Pew Research Center study.

US readers are increasingly opting for digital books instead of ink-and-paper editions, according to a Pew Research Center study released on Thursday.

The share of US adults reading electronic books rose to 23 percent in November from 16 percent the same time last year, according to the Pew study.

Meanwhile, ranks of people age 16 or older turning to pages of printed books fell to 67 percent from 72 percent, the findings indicated.

Overall, 75 percent of US adults read books in one form or another in a slight slip from the 78 percent figure seen late in 2011, according to the .

The growing popularity of e-books was in step with the hot trend in tablet computers, whether they are dedicated such as Kindles or Nooks or multi-purpose Internet portals such as Apple or Google Nexus devices.

The portion of US adults with some kind of tablet jumped to 33 percent late this year, as compared with 18 percent as 2011 came to an end, according to the Pew study.

Understandably, the number of people borrowing e-books from US libraries also rose, findings indicated.

People in higher education and income brackets were more likely to be e-book readers, as were those between the ages of 30 and 49, according to Pew.

The findings were based on a survey taken between October 15 and November 10.

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User comments : 3

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jonnyboy
2 / 5 (4) Dec 27, 2012
unlike the findings from the other 30 surveys that they ran ?
Marcos_Toledo
1 / 5 (4) Dec 28, 2012
The price of paperbacks are now what hardback were this was done to get rid of the used book market and render poor people illiterate and unable to put together there own private libraries. It is keep the poor ignorant and stupid. Bring down the price of paperbacks the E-Readers add to the price of buying books you have to buy batteries to use E-Readers.
TheRulingQueen
3 / 5 (4) Dec 28, 2012
So Marcos_Toledo, you think it's a conspiracy?????? Since we have washing machines, do you think we should really still be beating our clothes on a rock to clean them? How did you make that post? Did you write it on a piece of paper and throw it through the Physorg window? With people thinking like you, it's a thousand wonders we even had the gumption to step out of the cave. If our technology doesn't advance then neither do we as a species.

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