Experiment confirms existence of odd particle

Dec 04, 2012 by Kurt Riesselmann
Experiment confirms existence of odd particle
CMS experiment. Credit: CERN

Scientists working on the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider have confirmed the existence of an odd, puzzling particle first observed a few years ago at DOE's Tevatron particle collider. Members of the CMS collaboration announced on Nov. 14 that they had spotted the curious object, dubbed Y(4140), which scientists had discovered at the CDF experiment at Fermilab.

The particle has a mass of 4.1 billion electronvolts (GeV) and seems to be related to a handful of X and Y particles previously found at other laboratories. These particles are well measured but poorly understood. They don't fit the common pattern in which quarks and antiquarks bind together to form protons, neutrons, pions and other particles.

Some theorists think that X and Y particles resemble molecular structures. Perhaps they are made of two quark-antiquark pairs bound together for a short period of time. Or they could be something completely different.

With additional data, CMS scientists hope to understand the exact composition of the Y(4140) and get to the bottom of this mystery.

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vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (3) Dec 05, 2012
The particle has a mass of 4.1 billion electronvolts (GeV) and seems to be related to a handful of X and Y particles previously found at other laboratories. These particles are well measured but poorly understood. They don't fit the common pattern in which quarks and antiquarks bind together to form protons, neutrons, pions and other particles….


May be they are not true particles (something like electrons), because we do not know their mechanism explaining how it works. But rather they are just 'condensed disturbed vacuum fields'! The reason behind is that conventionally, they are coherent states of vacuum fields (this is why they are unstable). To visualize the mechanism which explains how it works, see…
http://www.vacuum...=9〈=en

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