The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government concerned with the United States' policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation's nuclear weapons program, nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy, energy conservation, energy-related research, radioactive waste disposal, and domestic energy production. DOE also sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other US federal agency; the majority of this research is conducted through its system of United States Department of Energy National Laboratories. The agency is administered by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland. In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war, the Atomic Energy Commission was created to control the future of the project.

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http://www.energy.gov/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Energy

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Driving chemical reactions by remote control

Students learn in high school that molecules must be in contact to react chemically. But what if that's not always true? It's that idea, which challenges textbook "laws," a team of theorists explored. They showed that even ...

Spin flipper upends protons

Protons spin. It's an intrinsic property that can affect experiments at accelerators that use beams of protons. Yet flipping proton spins could offer insights into nuclear physics experiments that study the first moments ...

Capturing energy flow in a plasma by measuring scattered light

Whether studying the core of our sun or the inside of a fusion reactor, scientists need to determine how energy flows in plasma. Scientists use simulations to calculate the flow. The simulations rely on the classical thermal ...

Catching fast changes in excited molecules

It's hard to see certain molecules react. The reaction is just that fast. Until now. A team of scientists devised a way to reveal time- and energy-resolved information on "dark" states of molecules—ones that are normally ...

Lithium ions flow through solid material

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with researchers from Purdue University and Rutgers University, have merged materials science and condensed matter physics ...

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