CDF seeks massive particle that could top the Top quark

October 24, 2005

Scientists at DOE's Fermilab are testing for the existence of a new particle up to five times more massive than the top quark.

With data collected from the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron, a University of Florida group searched for the particle by reconstructing the invariant mass of top quark pairs and looking for a peak in the mass spectrum.

Results hinted at a peak at about 500 GeV and analysis indicated that it was consistent with an extra 30 percent contribution from resonance to the top pair production cross section.

Scientists are collecting more data for the analysis to find out if the hypothesis of the new particle holds up.

Source: DOE Pulse (Kendra Snyder)

Explore further: First high-precision measurement of the mass of the W boson at the LHC

Related Stories

Dust storms linked to gas escape from Martian atmosphere

January 23, 2018

Some Mars experts are eager and optimistic for a dust storm this year to grow so grand it darkens skies around the entire Red Planet. This type of phenomenon in the environment of modern Mars could be examined as never before ...

Physicists create quantum state detector

January 18, 2018

Physicists from MIPT have teamed up with their colleagues in Russia and Great Britain and developed a superconducting quantum state detector. The new device can detect magnetic fields at low temperatures and is useful to ...

Recommended for you

Lyman-alpha emission detected around quasar J1605-0112

February 20, 2018

Using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument astronomers have discovered an extended and broad Lyman-alpha emission in the form of a nebula around the quasar J1605-0112. The finding is reported February 9 ...

Chemical waves guide to catalysts of the future

February 20, 2018

Spectacular electron microscope images at TU Wien lead to important findings: Chemical reactions can produce spiral-like multi-frequency waves and thus provide local information about catalysts.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.