Dinosaur-era acoustics: Global warming may give oceans the 'sound' of the Cretaceous

Oct 18, 2012

Global temperatures directly affect the acidity of the ocean, which in turn changes the acoustical properties of sea water. New research suggests that global warming may give Earth's oceans the same hi-fi sound qualities they had more than 100 million years ago, during the Age of the Dinosaurs.

The reason for this surprising communication upgrade is that whales vocalize in the low-frequency sound range, typically less than 200 hertz, and the new research predicts that by the year 2100, global warming will acidify saltwater sufficiently to make low-frequency sound near the ocean surface travel significantly farther than it currently does—perhaps twice as far.

Rhode Island acoustician David G. Browning, lead scientist on the research team, will present his findings at the 164th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held Oct. 22 – 26 in Kansas City, Missouri. He explains the sea change this way: "We call it the Cretaceous acoustic effect, because ocean acidification forced by global warming appears to be leading us back to the similar ocean acoustic conditions as those that existed 110 million years ago, during the ."

Their work builds on the recent investigation by other researchers who analyzed historic levels of boron in to reconstruct ocean acidity for the past 300 million years. Using boron's traits and impact on low-frequency transmission, Browning and his colleagues were able to predict the soundscape of to conclude that 300 million years ago, during the Paleozoic, the low frequency sound transmission in the ocean was similar to conditions today. They also found that transmission improved as the ocean became more acidic, reaching its best transmission value around 110 million years ago – allowing low frequency sound to travel twice as far.

"This knowledge is important in many ways," notes Browning. "It impacts the design and performance prediction of . It affects estimation of low frequency ambient noise levels in the ocean. And it's something we have to consider to improve our understanding of the sound environment of marine mammals and the effects of human activity on that environment."

If further work validates this model, future SCUBA divers might hear in the oceans with the same clarity as the dinosaurs.

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More information: asa.aip.org/asasearch.html

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gwrede
4.3 / 5 (6) Oct 18, 2012
If further work validates this model, future SCUBA divers might hear in the oceans with the same clarity as the dinosaurs.
I wish editors could stop embarrassing themselves.

On another note, this is bad news for the whales. With all propeller driven vessels in the oceans, this should increase whale and dolphin strandings. People don't want to live next to the railway or the airport, and whales shouldn't have to.
Shootist
1.9 / 5 (13) Oct 18, 2012
Global warming ended sixteen years ago.

http://www.dailym...-it.html
Allex
3.7 / 5 (9) Oct 18, 2012
Global warming ended sixteen years ago

They said the same thing 30 years ago. And you know what? The Earth is still warming up. Begone retarded troll.
Allex
4.3 / 5 (6) Oct 18, 2012
http://www.dailym...-it.html

Oh please...

http://metofficen...er-2012/

"It is the second article Mr Rose has written which contains some misleading information"
kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (10) Oct 19, 2012
One has to question the method for determining the supposed 300 million years:
Current sedimentation rates are such that all the sediment in all the seas would have accumulated in less than one million years - even when taking subduction into account.
So the question has to be asked - what assumptions did they make in determining their 300 million years? How justifiable are those assumptions?
These so-called clocks all depend on the assumptions of initial conditions and subsequent rates of change.
PinkElephant
5 / 5 (8) Oct 19, 2012
kevin,

Not that you ever read replies (as is apparent by your typical pattern of drive-by posting), but just in case you do read this one: see here for a detailed answer to your misunderstanding:

http://orgs.usd.e...ent.html

It's not even a very complete answer (it doesn't talk about radiometric dating, annual layers that can be counted like tree rings, or embedded layers in seafloor sediments that contain emissions from volcanic eruptions, or features in the sediment layers recording the oscillations and reversals of the global magnetic field, etc. -- all of which helps date things, and put things in proper context.)

But as far as directly addressing rates of accumulation vs. subduction, see the above link as it does so more than adequately.
Claudius
1.7 / 5 (6) Oct 19, 2012
Global warming ended sixteen years ago

They said the same thing 30 years ago. And you know what? The Earth is still warming up. Begone retarded troll.


From the article referred to, Phil Jones agreed there was a plateau in warming for the past 15-16 years.

"Some climate scientists, such as Professor Phil Jones, director of the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, last week dismissed the significance of the plateau, saying that 15 or 16 years is too short a period from which to draw conclusions."

"The data does suggest a plateau, he admitted, and without a major El Nino event – the sudden, dramatic warming of the southern Pacific which takes place unpredictably and always has a huge effect on global weather – 'it could go on for a while'."

"Prof Jones also admitted that the climate models were imperfect..."

Claudius
1.7 / 5 (6) Oct 19, 2012
http://www.dailym...-it.html

"It is the second article Mr Rose has written which contains some misleading information"


Read this comment from the author of the article you reference: {http://metofficen...r-2012/)

"We agree with Mr Rose that there has been only a very small amount of warming in the 21st Century."
Anda
3 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2012
Fuck, we are talking about improved acoustic properties of sea water and their consequences, not discussing facts as global warming nor talking about an old book.
We are tired of all these retarded commenting in every article of the site
rubberman
4 / 5 (4) Oct 19, 2012
http://www.dailym...-it.html

"We agree with Mr Rose that there has been only a very small amount of warming in the 21st Century."


Plateaud....OK. So we have plateaud at a level of a year that was once considered a climate outlier, and at a level that would appear to cause a summer ice free arctic ocean earlier than any climate scenario predicted, and changed precipitation patterns enough to turn the US bread basket into a desert.

Allex
4.2 / 5 (5) Oct 19, 2012
"We agree with Mr Rose that there has been only a very small amount of warming in the 21st Century."

Quote mining much?

"As we've stressed before, choosing a starting or end point on short-term scales can be very misleading. Climate change can only be detected from multi-decadal timescales due to the inherent variability in the climate system. If you use a longer period from HadCRUT4 the trend looks very different."

Well, the 21st Century is just 11 years old and since we measure long-term climate change in decades or centuries your argument looks just silly.
Claudius
2 / 5 (4) Oct 19, 2012
@allex, @rubberman

Don't worry, there is always hope that warming will resume at a decent rate. No need to panic. Yet. As Phil Jones said (re the plateau:) "It could go on for a while."
rubberman
3 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2012
@allex, @rubberman

Don't worry, there is always hope that warming will resume at a decent rate. No need to panic. Yet. As Phil Jones said (re the plateau:) "It could go on for a while."


I was hoping for a plague or massive outbreak of an incurable disease...oh well. Thanks for the encouraging words.
Claudius
1 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2012
@allex, @rubberman

Don't worry, there is always hope that warming will resume at a decent rate. No need to panic. Yet. As Phil Jones said (re the plateau:) "It could go on for a while."


I was hoping for a plague or massive outbreak of an incurable disease...oh well. Thanks for the encouraging words.


There are also an awful lot of asteroids crossing Earth's orbit, not to mention the eventual red giant stage of the Sun.
rubberman
5 / 5 (1) Oct 19, 2012
@allex, @rubberman

Don't worry, there is always hope that warming will resume at a decent rate. No need to panic. Yet. As Phil Jones said (re the plateau:) "It could go on for a while."


I was hoping for a plague or massive outbreak of an incurable disease...oh well. Thanks for the encouraging words.


There are also an awful lot of asteroids crossing Earth's orbit, not to mention the eventual red giant stage of the Sun.


Super volcano eruption or another Carrington event could cause enough chaos to trim alot of the fat as well.

My worries have been unfounded, this ship will right itself.
VendicarD
4 / 5 (4) Oct 19, 2012
Correct...

https://docs.goog...1bUhRQUE

"Some climate scientists, such as Professor Phil Jones, director of the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, last week dismissed the significance of the plateau, saying that 15 or 16 years is too short a period from which to draw conclusions." - Phil Jones

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