NASA researchers replace silica with polymers to create more flexible aerogels

Sep 28, 2012 by Bob Yirka weblog
Credit: NASA's Glenn Research Center

(Phys.org)—Back in the early thirties, the story goes, a couple of unknown chemists set about betting one another as to whether they could remove the water from a jelly that had been gelled with pectin, without causing the jelly to shrink. The resultant efforts produced what are known today as aerogels, sometimes referred to as liquid smoke because of their very low densities. Chemists have produced them by mixing silica based materials with water, then removing the water via supercritical drying. Unfortunately, the material produced is very brittle and thus easily broken which limits its use. Because of this researchers at NASA's Glenn Research Center looked to polymers (types of plastics) to see if a new type of aerogel could be created that would be less brittle.

In the research, led by Mary Ann B. Meador, who described the teams' efforts at a recent national meeting of the , the group first tried coating the with various polymers to see if they could reduce the brittleness, but such efforts proved very slow and the results exhibited low melting temperatures, which reduced their usefulness. For those reasons, they wondered if it might not be possible to simply replace the silica with some type of altogether, because the only purpose of the silica in the first place was to allow for a structure to exist. The problem of course, is that with most such polymers, when subjected to supercritical drying, they tend to shrink, just like jellies back in the thirties. Thus, the team had to find another approach.

That approach involved cross linking certain polymers with a bridging compound resulting in a new polymer that was stiff enough to hold its shape when subjected to supercritical drying, yet would remain flexible overall; an approach that worked so well that the team was able to create several different types of polymer aerogels that exhibit extraordinary properties.

Some of the new examples proved to be exceedingly strong; enough so to support a car when constructed as a thick slab and placed under a tire, the team reports. Others could be made into thin sheets with superb thermal resistance due to their being up to 95% air, which opens the door to a myriad of possibilities ranging from sleeping bag linings to new kinds of refrigerator insulation.

More importantly perhaps, at least to the research team, this being NASA after all, are the possibilities the new aerogels allow for future space missions, from space suit insulators to decelerator vehicle components that could one day help craft make it safely through the oftentimes harsh atmospheres found on other planets.

Explore further: A refined approach to proteins at low resolution

More information:
Polyimide Aerogels
Polymer Aerogels Provide Insulation For Earth And Space

Related Stories

Recommended for you

A refined approach to proteins at low resolution

Sep 19, 2014

Membrane proteins and large protein complexes are notoriously difficult to study with X-ray crystallography, not least because they are often very difficult, if not impossible, to crystallize, but also because ...

Base-pairing protects DNA from UV damage

Sep 19, 2014

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich researchers have discovered a further function of the base-pairing that holds the two strands of the DNA double helix together: it plays a crucial role in protecting ...

Smartgels are thicker than water

Sep 19, 2014

Transforming substances from liquids into gels plays an important role across many industries, including cosmetics, medicine, and energy. But the transformation process, called gelation, where manufacturers ...

Separation of para and ortho water

Sep 18, 2014

(Phys.org) —Not all water is equal—at least not at the molecular level. There are two versions of the water molecule, para and ortho water, in which the spin states of the hydrogen nuclei are different. ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

daqman
5 / 5 (4) Sep 28, 2012
I'm fairly certain that "liquid smoke" is something that you get in the supermarket for flavouring foods. Aerogels are often referred to as "solid smoke".
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Sep 28, 2012
Perhaps the motivation is the space shuttle's ceramic tiling - a brilliant innovation with brittleness as an Achilles heel.
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Sep 28, 2012
As second thought this is ideal to replace the air in all tires.
Akron is the headquarters of all tire producing companies in the world - they must decide if such a solution serves their interest.