EU satellite navigation system opens headquarters in Prague

September 6, 2012

(AP)—The EU's industry and entrepreneurship commissioner says the bloc's long-delayed satellite navigation program is expected to be partly operational by the end of 2014.

Antonio Tajani—speaking at the official opening of the new 's headquarters in the Czech capital, Prague on Thursday—said that two satellites will be launched next month, and from next year four more will go up every six months until a network of 30 is completed.

After years of delays, the first two Galileo satellites were placed into last year.

Tajani said that from 2014-2020 it will cost euro7 billion ($8.9 billion) to complete and maintain the system. The system should be fully operational by 2020.

The EU says the system is more precise and more reliable than the U.S. .

Explore further: EU announces launch date for first Galileo satellites

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