Related topics: satellite

Rare 'itinerant breeding' behavior revealed in California bird

Reproduction and migration are the two most demanding tasks in a bird's life, and the vast majority of species separate them into different times of the year. Only two bird species have been shown to undertake what scientists ...

GPS helping provide more precise precipitation predictions

Scientists are using GPS signals to measure air moisture for better weather forecasting. The method is now being incorporated into the Bureau of Meteorology's weather forecast models following successful tests over Australia, ...

NASA small satellites can aid hurricane forecasts with GPS

Eight briefcase-size satellites flying in a row may be key to improving forecasts of a hurricane's wind speed—detecting whether it will make landfall as a Category 1 or a Category 5. NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite ...

NASA activates Deep Space Atomic Clock

An atomic clock that could pave the way for autonomous deep space travel was successfully activated last week and is ready to begin its year-long tech demo, the mission team confirmed on Friday, Aug. 23, 2019. Launched in ...

Satellites assisting look into hurricanes

A mission to probe winds deep inside hurricanes, where most satellites cannot see and few aircraft venture, is showing signs of success despite an unexpected obstacle linked to tensions in the Middle East.

Every bat travels differently

The females of some bat species migrate hundreds of kilometers after hibernation to give birth to their offspring in insect-rich regions. Unlike birds, it is largely unknown how bats keep their energy consumption low during ...

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Global Positioning System

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) developed by the United States Department of Defense and managed by the United States Air Force 50th Space Wing. It is the only fully functional GNSS in the world, can be used freely by anyone, anywhere, and is often used by civilians for navigation purposes. It uses a constellation of between 24 and 32 medium Earth orbit satellites that transmit precise radiowave signals, which allow GPS receivers to determine their current location, the time, and their velocity. Its official name is NAVSTAR GPS. Although NAVSTAR is not an acronym, a few backronyms have been created for it.

Since it became fully operational on April 27, 1995, GPS has become a widely used aid to navigation worldwide, and a useful tool for map-making, land surveying, commerce, scientific uses, tracking and surveillance, and hobbies such as geocaching. Also, the precise time reference is used in many applications including the scientific study of earthquakes and as a required time synchronization method for cellular network protocols such as the IS-95 standard for CDMA.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA