EU eyes a cloud computing heaven

Sep 27, 2012
People crowd at a cloud computing exhibition at the CeBIT IT fair in Germany. With the cloud computing business still in its relatively early days, the European Union has moved to secure a toehold in a potentially lucrative market it says could deliver 2.5 million new jobs.

With the cloud computing business still in its relatively early days, the European Union moved on Thursday to secure a toehold in a potentially lucrative market it says could deliver 2.5 million new jobs.

"We want to make Europe not just cloud-friendly but cloud-active," said the EU's commissioner for digital affairs Neelie Kroes, announcing plans to develop European standards and certifications to get business to join the cloud.

"Cloud computing" consists of storing data and software on remote servers accessed over the Internet by e-mail, social network or video-game users without having to invest in added software.

Using remote servers in centres that can be the size of football fields is popular with services such as and Spotify but as an economy of scale, the system cuts IT costs for businesses by 10 to 20 percent.

Kroes estimated a speed-up in the use of cloud computing both in the and by public services could add 160 billion euros ($206 billion) to the EU economy—or around 1.0 percent—by 2020.

"But this can only happen if we get the policies right," she said. "Today many potential users think it is too complicated, too risky or too untrustworthy."

The EU needed to set standards by 2013, approve EU-wide certification schemes and help develop contracts to reassure users, she said.

Europe must reconquer its lost technological edge, Kroes said. "We were in the driver's seat in the 1990s. We should come back."

With cloud-computing currently one of the fastest growing sources of as centres leave servers running 24/7, the EU also is funding a scheme to "green" the cloud through the use of new, more efficient technology.

The Eurocloud project aims to reduce power needs by 90 percent in conventional data centres by adapting low-power microprocessor technologies commonly used in mobile phones.

Explore further: Technip, Heerema win third giant Angolan oil contract

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Oracle buys 'cloud' service firm RightNow

Oct 24, 2011

Enterprise software giant Oracle said Monday it had struck a deal to buy RightNow Technologies, which helps companies manage their cloud computing activities, for $1.5 billion.

SAP sees new acquisition as boon for cloud computing

Dec 11, 2011

The acquisition of US firm Success Factors by SAP will make the German software giant number one in "cloud computing" and show a profit from 2013, a top SAP executive said in an interview published Saturday.

Recommended for you

Technip, Heerema win third giant Angolan oil contract

1 hour ago

The ultra-deep Angolan offshore oil project called Kaombo generated the third huge contract in three days on Wednesday when French group Total picked two firms to carry out underwater engineering worth $3.5 billion.

Yahoo sees signs of growth in 'core' (Update)

16 hours ago

Yahoo reported a stronger-than-expected first-quarter profit Tuesday, results hailed by chief executive Marissa Mayer as showing growth in the Web giant's "core" business.

Twitter buys data analytics partner Gnip

19 hours ago

Twitter says it has bought its data partner Gnip, which provides analysis of the more than 500 million tweets its users share each day—to advertisers, academic institutions, politicians and other customers.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Squirrel
1 / 5 (1) Sep 27, 2012
Eurocloud Cuckoo Land has as much chance of success as its Cuckoo Land Euro.

More news stories

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

Unlocking secrets of new solar material

(Phys.org) —A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have ...