NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Haikui make landfall in China

Aug 08, 2012

Typhoon Haikui weakened to a tropical storm just before landfall in China. Eight hours after landfall, NASA's Aqua satellite still showed a strong and organized tropical storm moving inland.

China's National Meteorological Center (NMC) said that Tropical Storm Haikui, made in Zhejiang province on August 8 at 3:20 a.m. local time (19:20 UTC or 3:20 p.m. EDT/U.S., August 7), about 140 miles (225 km) south of Shanghai. The Joint 's last official warning on Haikui was issued on August 8 at 0300 UTC (11 a.m. local time/Shanghai). At that time Haikui's were near 60 knots (69 mph/111.1 kmh) and it was located about 95 miles south of Shanghai, near 29.7 North latitude and 121.3 East longitude. It was moving to the northwest at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kmh).

By 5 p.m. EDT Shanghai local time on August 8 Haikui was located near the city of Huzhou. NMC reported heavy rainfall with totals as high as 17 inches (434 millimeters) in Xiangshan, Taizhou, and Ninghai, all located in the southeast coastal province of Zhejiang.

A of Tropical Storm Haikui was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite on August 8, 2012 at 0520 UTC (1:20 a.m. EDT/1:20 p.m. Shanghai local time) after it made landfall south of Shanghai, China. The MODIS image showed an organized with high thunderstorms around the center that cast shadows on the lower surrounding storms. Those higher thunderstorms were likely dropping heavy rainfall.

Haikui is moving northwest and is expected to weaken and dissipate over land in the next couple of days.

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